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2020-08-14 21:42:12
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This SEPTA bus operating on Rt.33 is seen travelling around Logan Circle near downtown Philadelphia.

          

   

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This motor coach is seen on Market St. in downtown Philadelphia.

          

   

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This motor coach is seen engaged in charter service at 20th. and Arch St. in Philadelphia.

          

   

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This motor coach is seen in Philadelphia on 30th. St. below Market St.

          

   

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This Coach USA motor coach is seen near downtown Philadelphia engaged in charter service.

          

   

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This motor coach is seen awaiting passengers at 5t. & Ranstead St. in downtown Philadelphia.

          

   

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This motor coach was photographed laying over at 15th. and JFK Blvd. in center city Philadelphia.

          

   

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This motor coach is seen engaged in charter service on Girard Ave. in a section of Philadelphia known as Northern Liberties.

          

   

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This motor coach is seen on Rhawn St. in the northeast section of Philadelphia.

          

Orthopaedic Surgery/ Adult Joint Reconstruction- Faculty Position- Temple Health- Philadelphia, PA   

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Temple University - Orthopaedic Surgery/ Adult Joint Reconstruction - Faculty Position Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University Philadelphia, PA The Departme...

          

"Mother Bethel A.M.E. Church" Fan, Philadelphia   

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This "Mother Bethel A.M.E. Church" fan was likely saved from trip that the Indianapolis Bethel congregation took to Philadelphia for the 200th Anniversary of the A.M.E. Church in June 1987. An illustration of Mother Bethel church and a photo of its pastor Dr. Simon P. Bowie appear on the fan. Text on the fan reads, "God our Father - Christ our Redeemer - Man our Brother. Mother Bethel A.M.E. Church (organized by Richard Allen 1787). 419 Richard Allen Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19147. Stands on the oldest parcel of ground continuously owned by Blacks."

          

PIMIENTOS RELLENOS DE SURIMI Y ATUN   

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Vamos a ir desengrasando de tanto buñuelo y tanta cosa rica que hemos preparado para estos días... pero claro, estos días, son la antesala de lo que se avecina: la navidad, gran fiesta, verdad?
Esta recetita, es sencillla, y sobretodo muy práctica porque es rápida y nos vale para grandes ocasiones, y para ocasiones más cotidianas. No lleva muchos ingredientes y como acompañamiento va estupendo. Yo lo hago como un primero ligero, pero vamos, eso va en gustos y usos....
INGREDIENTES
  • 1 lata, o bote de pimientos del piquillo enteros para rellenar ( a mi me gustan los de Mercadona, pero uso cualquier otro)
  • 1 paquete de palitos de cangrejo (8-9 unidades)
  • 1lata de atún escurrido ligeramente
  • unas gambas descongeladas
  • 1/2 cebolla picada muy fina
  • 1 chorreón de vino blanco
  • 2 cucharadas colmadas de queso de untar Philadelphia,o cualquier otra marca
  • 2 quesitos
  • 1 chorrito de leche
ELABORACION
  1. Escurrir los pimientos, con cuidado y dejando el caldo reservado. Luego lo usaremos. Reservar 2 de los pimientos también sin rellenar.
  2. Picar muy finos todos los ingredientes.
  3. Saltear la cebolla con un pelín de aceite. No echar mucho porque se queda demasiado engrasado y a mi, personalmente no me gusta mucho. Sofreir y si vemos que se quiere agarrar a la sartén, le añadimos el vino. Se lo añadimos de todas formas.
  4. Añadir las gambas picaditas y saltear hasta que se hagan.
  5. Agregar los palitos y la lata de atún y rehogar todo bien. Añadimos el queso de untar e integrar y mezclar todos los ingredientes juntos en la sartén.
  6. Rellenar los pimientos e ir colocándolos en una bandeja de horno, o una fuente de microondas.
  7. En el vaso de la batidora, echar el caldo de los pimientos, los dos quesitos, y el chorrito de leche, que será muy poco. Es mejor ir añadiendo que pasarse. Batirlo bien y echarlo por encima de los pimientos.
  8. Hornearlos un ratito para que se mezclen sabores y la salsa espese un poquito. En el micro lo mismo, porque no neccesita gratinar.
Si nos gustara la bechamel, los podemos hacer con una muy ligera y queso rallado por encima. Y no son tan dietéticos, pero de sabor mejor que mejor....

          

Chaput says Catholic life needs to be reignited; American culture is a new kind of mission territory   

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Philadelphia archbishop and Capuchin friar Charles J. Chaput writes well about the sobering reality of evangelization in his weekly column for this week. (Get in the habit of reading the Archbishop’s weekly essay.) The content of His Excellency’s essay “The new communities and the ‘New Evangelization‘” has “three simple things today: first, I’ll share some observations on the general state of the Church; second, I’ll talk about the role of new communities and charisms like the Sodalitium in the new evangelization; and third, I’ll offer some thoughts

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Family Portrait No. 2   

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Today I dismantle Family Portrait to make way for WERK, WERK, WERK by Matt Harley.  I am compelled to revisit the installation by Charlie, Nick, Alex, and Jeff Bierk, however, before moving on with my stabs at blogging.


My first impression when the work was being unpacked and installed was more than favourable - I was stunned.  I had visited their studios in Toronto a couple of times and have been corresponding with them, so I was familiar with their work, but to say I am impressed by these four emerging artists is an understatement.  Of course, they had a pretty good teacher and their father's influence permeates the show.

Whether it is the painting application, technique, format, or the execution of the work, David Bierk could be seen in the installation.  Rightfully so, too.  For anyone to suggest these guys attempt to deny the influence would be just plain wrong, especially at this early stage of their careers.  The fact that they have embraced the power of their father and his oeuvre speaks to their intelligence and respect for his legacy.  

For CRAM, Alex and Charlie painted their pieces, Nick put together a video assemblage, and Jeff crafted a photo and trophy construction.   Nick's piece is a new development and surprisingly accomplished for a first video work.  He didn't totally abandon his father or his own independent exploration of painting for the past few years in this switch of mediums; he used his easel with intact and wet traces of oil paint to hold a picture-framed flatscreen.  The video loop is an intimate portrait of Heather Dylan Bierk talking with him about family matters during the settlement of the estate that followed his mother's untimely death.  The editing by Nick is smart and discreet - it captures a meaningful moment in his relationship with Heather that has far-reaching significance.  As a portrait it is brilliant and as video it is smart stuff.



When seeing it through the door of CRAM Gallery for the first time, more than one local CRAM patron commented that they had to approach the painting to check it out closely, in order to determine whether Charlie's contribution was a huge photo or a really good photo realism painting.  

Zac is a large scale painting of Charlie's half-brother, the former NHL goalie in the family. A professional star while he was growing up, Zac is appropriately rendered much larger-than-life and with energized strokes.  There is not even the thought of airbrush here and Charlie, like Nick, has found himself in new creative territory and all-the-while acknowledging two obvious sources of inspiration.  His hand is seen in the gesture of the application of oil paint and anyone who has studied both David Bierk and Chuck Close portraits will see Charlie's emerging identity. His reply to the question of scale was: "I really like the freedom...".  Bang!

  

The twins, Jeff and Alex, are the oldest of the foursome and, because of their age are a few steps ahead of their younger brothers in their career development. Lisa Fragment by Alex is a painting of their oldest half-sibling (it was still totally wet on opening day) and Trophy Brother by Jeff is a slick photo portrait of Sebastian, and everyone on the planet knows Skid Row's Sebastian Bierk.  

The small scale of Lisa Fragment belies the inherent statement embodied here, and the fact is that Alex incorporated her part of the story very succinctly.  It took me a while to discern the import of this small painting. 

Nothing needs to be said, really, about the portrait of Sebastian, except that using his old trophies lends the work bona fide objet d' art status.  (This might be an otherwise seemingly remote statement without considering that I recently went to Philadelphia to see Duchamp's Nude N. 2 where I also looked at his other work there up close and personal.)


With that said, each of the Bierks did make their own identifiable statement, for want of a better way of putting it, and their combined efforts infused Family Portrait with the dense multi-layering one would expect of an exhibition about the Bierk family, and by more seasoned artists.  This showing was totally "sick".

Did I mention their crazy and precocious energy?

          

Washington: Seattle's New Approach To Drug Offenses Produces Nearly 60% Reduction In Recidivism   

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LEAD Establishes Unique Collaboration Among Law Enforcement, Human Service Agencies, Business Leaders, and Community Members

Interest in LEAD Grows Among Major Cities Across the Nation, Including New York City, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Philadelphia, Houston, Atlanta, and Albany

According to a new, independent study by a University of Washington evaluation team, one of the nation’s most innovative and promising approaches to ending the War On Drugs and mass incarceration has been shown to produce a dramatic drop in recidivism.

In 2011, Seattle launched "Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion" (LEAD), a bold new harm reduction-oriented approach to address low-level drug and prostitution crimes and break the cycle of addiction, joblessness and homelessness. Under LEAD, police officers exercise discretion to divert individuals for certain criminal offenses (including low-level drug sales) to a case manager and a comprehensive network of services, instead of booking them to jail and initiating the standard criminal justice process.

LEAD established a unique collaboration between multiple stakeholders who all work together to find new ways to solve old problems. Stakeholders include police, district attorneys, mental health and drug treatment providers, housing providers and other service agencies, the business community, public defenders, elected officials, and community leaders.

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U.S. Airlines, After Rebuilding Home Networks, Look to Expand Overseas   

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U.S. airlines are rediscovering the rest of the world after years of ceding market share to rivals and international partners on overseas flights.
 
The big three network carriers are adding more than a dozen new routes and thousands of additional seats each week to destinations as far afield as South Africa, India and Croatia, reversing the trend over several years when they were outgrown by foreign airlines.
 
U.S. airlines are betting that three years of rebuilding their home networks by bolstering hubs and adding flights to smaller cities have given them a better foundation to expand overseas.
 
They are armed with new aircraft equipped with amenities that can boost margins on overseas flights, such as lie-flat seats. The strong dollar, meanwhile, is luring more Americans to far-flung locations abroad, creating a bigger pool of potential customers on new routes.
 
U.S. carriers will fly around two million more seats to and from Europe between May and July this year compared with the same period last year, according to published schedules, while domestic capacity will rise at less than half that pace, adding about 2.3 million seats.
 
That would reverse three years that saw overseas carriers claim a majority of the passengers flying into and out of the U.S.
 
American Airlines Group Inc., Delta Air Lines Inc. and United Continental Holdings Inc. were outgunned by the rapid expansion of carriers from the Middle East and China, and new low-cost, long-haul airlines such as Norwegian Air Shuttle A/S. Now, rivals such as Emirates Airline have slowed their expansion while U.S. carriers grow abroad again.
 
American leads the pack with 8.3% growth in capacity this summer, almost twice the pace of carriers in its Oneworld alliance, which includes British Airways and other members of International Consolidated Airlines Group SA. American raised the number of flights by less than 1% to Europe in the same period last year, while Oneworld expanded by 3.4%.
 
Delta and United are also taking on more European flying this summer than their partners in the SkyTeam and Star alliances, respectively. Growth across the Atlantic outweighs a drop in flights to Asia caused by cuts in flights to Japan and China, as well as a slowdown to Latin America because of the cooling economies in Brazil and Argentina. Middle East-based carriers such as Emirates, previously one of the biggest drivers of growth into the U.S., have dialed back because of slowing Asian economies. The recent closure of some airspace in the Gulf because of U.S.-Iran tensions has exacerbated their slowdown.
 
“We’re pivoting,” said Joe Esposito, Delta’s senior vice president of network planning. “We intend to be balanced with our partners.”
 
Delta is the biggest U.S. airline by traffic on flights to Europe, and over the past three years it has boosted annual domestic capacity by 4% and international flights by just 1%. This year it will expand its own international flying by 3%—in line with domestic growth—and more than twice that pace across the Atlantic.
 
Buying airline tickets can be a maddening ordeal. Luckily, new studies are providing some clues into the inner workings of airline ticket pricing. WSJ's Scott McCartney has the details. Photo: Getty Images.
 
“We’ve really turbocharged the network,” said Patrick Quayle, United’s vice president of its international network, with additions focused on linking its hubs with those of Star partners such as Deutsche Lufthansa AG . It’s started flying between Denver and Frankfurt, while adding flights to secondary European cities such as Prague and Naples from its beefed-up Newark hub.
 
Some industry experts say new destinations like Cape Town—which United plans to start flying to in December—and Dubrovnik aren’t likely to generate enough premium traffic to make those routes profitable for U.S. carriers.
 
 
United has added 22 new routes to Europe since 2017. Here, a United plane prepares to land at London’s Heathrow Airport. PHOTO: SIMON DAWSON/BLOOMBERG NEWS
“I wonder if they’re getting into a contest to see who can fly to the most places overseas,” said Mike Boyd, president of Boyd International, a consultant who advises airports working to attract new carriers.
 
Vasu Raja, American’s vice president of network and schedule planning, acknowledged that U.S. carriers had in the past started some overseas routes before there were sufficient domestic travelers to sustain them. They also underinvested in long-haul aircraft to match services offered by partners and rivals.
 
American lacked the lie-flat beds preferred by business passengers on planes flying between JFK and Heathrow until 2016, he said. That made flying on partner British Airways’ jets more attractive on the world’s biggest premium route by revenue. BA operates 10 daily “shuttle” flights to Heathrow, but American—after adding new Boeing 777-300ER jets with lie-flat beds—now flies four as part of the alliance’s daily shuttle service.
 
American is adding new services to Dublin and Munich from its Dallas-Fort Worth hub, and from Philadelphia to secondary cities such as Prague, Bologna and Dubrovnik that it wouldn’t have considered two years ago. The airline last week also ordered 50 Airbus SE A321XLR jets, a single aisle plane that can link the Midwest to central Europe.
 
JetBlue Airways Corp. also this week ordered more long-haul Airbus jets and plans to start flights to London in 2021.
 
Bolstering the number of passengers they can feed through domestic hubs has also given U.S. carriers more bargaining power within the alliances. Regulators allow alliance members to market flights and set fares together, with revenue typically split according to how much flying each carrier does.
 
The division of sales and profits between partners has become more sophisticated and airlines are more willing to shuffle flying according to available aircraft and the relative strength of their hubs, said Jeff Arinder, Delta’s vice president of alliances.
 
Source: The Wall Street Journal

          

Donald Trump vs. OPEC   

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As of last week's price report from the US Energy Information Administration, the average US pump price of regular gasoline has gone up by $0.19 per gallon since the first week of March. That reflects normal seasonal factors but is mainly due to a jump in international crude oil prices of around $8 per barrel in the same period. President Trump's accusation that OPEC is responsible for rising fuel costs shouldn't have surprised anyone:



Last Friday's tweet prompted a quick retort from Saudi Oil Minister al-Falih: "there is no such thing as an artificial price." It doesn't require a deep study of OPEC or economics to conclude that, however phrased, Mr. Trump's remark was closer to the truth than his chosen foil's reply on this issue.

The more interesting question is whether OPEC's very intentional efforts in conjunction with Russia to tighten oil markets are actually harmful to US interests at this point. Could our instinctive reaction to rising oil prices be based on outdated thinking from the long era of perceived scarcity that began with the oil crises of the 1970s and ended, more or less, with this decade's US shale boom?

Let's recall that less than four years ago oil prices fell below $100 per barrel as the rapidly growing output of US shale, or "tight oil" production from wells in North Dakota and South and West Texas created a global oil surplus and rising oil inventories. Oil prices went into free fall around the end of 2014--eventually bottoming out below $30 per barrel--after Saudi Arabia and the rest of OPEC abandoned their output quotas and opened up the taps.

That response to the shale wave began the only period in at least four decades when the oil market could truly be characterized as free, when all producers essentially pumped as much oil as they desired. Some referred to it as OPEC's "war on shale."

However, those conditions proved to be just as hard on OPEC as on US shale producers, and by the end of 2016 OPEC blinked. The output agreement between OPEC's members and a group of non-OPEC producing countries led by Russia has been in place over a year, and it has taken this long to dry up the excess inventories that had accumulated in 2015-16. OPEC's quota compliance--historically mediocre at best--was aided significantly by geopolitical factors affecting several producers, notably the ongoing implosion of Venezuela's economy and the oil industry on which it depends.

Given all this, it's fair to say that OPEC has engineered today's higher oil prices, while its leading members contemplate even higher prices. It's much less obvious that this is bad for the US, which now has a vibrant and diverse energy sector and is finally approaching the energy independence that politicians have touted since the late 1970s.

Prior to the shift in the focus of the shale revolution from natural gas to oil, the US was still a substantial net importer of petroleum and its products. In 2010, we imported over 9 million barrels per day more than we exported. That was around half of our total petroleum supply. Today, these figures are under 4 million barrels per day and 20%, respectively.

That means that when the price of oil rises, this is no longer followed by enormous outflows of dollars leaving the US to enrich Middle East and other producers. Something like 80 cents of every dollar increase in the price of oil stays in the US, and in the short run the effect may be even more beneficial as investment in US production steps up in response.

In other words, when oil prices go up and gasoline and diesel prices follow, the main effect on the US economy is to shift money from one portion of the economy to another, rather than the whole economy springing a large leak. What makes that shift challenging is that consumers come out on the short end, while oil exploration and production companies, and to some extent oil refiners, gain.

A useful way to gauge the impact on consumers is to compare one year's prices to the previous year's. When oil prices were falling a few years ago, year-on-year drops of as much as $1.00 per gallon for gasoline (2014-15) put up to $100 billion a year back into the pockets of consumers. That provided a timely stimulus for an economy still recovering from the financial crisis of the previous decade.

As oil prices started to recover last year, these comparisons turned negative. Currently, the average regular gasoline price is $0.31/gal. higher than last year at this time. If gas prices were to stay that much higher than last year's for the rest of 2018, it would impose a drag of about $45 billion on consumer spending. $2.75/gal. is the highest US average unleaded regular price for April since 2014. Although gas is still nearly $1.00/gal. cheaper than it was then, memories tend to be short.

We may be living in a new era of energy abundance, but I am skeptical that our political instincts have caught up with these altered circumstances. The price of gasoline is still arguably the most visible price in America. When it goes up week after week, consumers notice, even in an economy running at essentially "full employment" and growing at 3% per year.

Most of those consumers are potential voters, and this is another election year with much at stake. In that light, I would not expect President Trump to abandon his attack on "artificial prices" for oil, even if it's arguable that the US economy as a whole may not be worse off with oil over $70 instead of below $60 per barrel.




          

A Dark Arts October - Day 16   

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"THE NEGATIVE ONE"

DESTINATION - EASTERN STATE PENITENTIARY 
LOCATION - PHILADELPHIA, PA
PHOTOGRAPHER: DEREK MCENTIRE


*A Dark Arts October is a month-long celebration of the work of 25 year old Derek McEntire, a photographer from Lancaster, Pennsylvania.  His eye for the melancholy and macabre in abandoned locations makes for a perfect feature for FASCINATION WITH FEAR for this, the spookiest time of the year.

Bio in his own words:   "I fell into photography by accident when visiting Eastern State Penitentiary.  After visiting,  I entered a picture I took in a photography competition and got first place... from that point on I fell in love with the art of photography.   My all time favorite artist is Andy Warhol and my favorite musicians include  Johnathan Davis of the band Korn, Billy Corgan from the band The Smashing Pumpkins, and Robert Smith from The Cure.  In my spare time I enjoy music and going to concerts, traveling and drinking coffee/teas.  My current project includes my 2018 Destination Abandoned Photography Calendar.  It will be up for purchase no later than December 2017."


Please check out his website www.derekmcentirephotos.com or email him directly at dmcentire71@gmail.com for more information on purchasing photos.
Instagram:  derekmcentire

          

A Dark Arts October - Day 23   

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"HEAVY SENSES"

Destination - Eastern State Penitentiary
Location - Philadelphia, PA
Photographer - Derek McEntire


*A Dark Arts October is a month-long celebration of the work of 25 year old Derek McEntire, a photographer from Lancaster, Pennsylvania.  His eye for the melancholy and macabre in abandoned locations makes for a perfect feature for FASCINATION WITH FEAR for this, the spookiest time of the year.

Bio in his own words:   "I fell into photography by accident when visiting Eastern State Penitentiary.  After visiting,  I entered a picture I took in a photography competition and got first place... from that point on I fell in love with the art of photography.   My all time favorite artist is Andy Warhol and my favorite musicians include  Johnathan Davis of the band Korn, Billy Corgan from the band The Smashing Pumpkins, and Robert Smith from The Cure.  In my spare time I enjoy music and going to concerts, traveling and drinking coffee/teas.  My current project includes my 2018 Destination Abandoned Photography Calendar.  It will be up for purchase no later than December 2017."


Please check out his website www.derekmcentirephotos.com or email him directly at dmcentire71@gmail.com for more information on purchasing photos.
Instagram:  derekmcentire


          

A Dark Arts October - Day 30   

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"CELL BLOCK 9"

Destination - Eastern State Penitentiary 
Location - Philadelphia, PA
Photographer - Derek McEntire


*A Dark Arts October is a month-long celebration of the work of 25 year old Derek McEntire, a photographer from Lancaster, Pennsylvania.  His eye for the melancholy and macabre in abandoned locations makes for a perfect feature for FASCINATION WITH FEAR for this, the spookiest time of the year.

Bio in his own words:   "I fell into photography by accident when visiting Eastern State Penitentiary.  After visiting,  I entered a picture I took in a photography competition and got first place... from that point on I fell in love with the art of photography.   My all time favorite artist is Andy Warhol and my favorite musicians include  Johnathan Davis of the band Korn, Billy Corgan from the band The Smashing Pumpkins, and Robert Smith from The Cure.  In my spare time I enjoy music and going to concerts, traveling and drinking coffee/teas.  My current project includes my 2018 Destination Abandoned Photography Calendar.  It will be up for purchase no later than December 2017."


Please check out his website www.derekmcentirephotos.com or email him directly at dmcentire71@gmail.com for more information on purchasing photos.
Instagram:  derekmcentire


          

Faspro's Past and Future Trade Shows   

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This blog post is a trade show special. Since the last post, we have been to three shows around the country and are preparing to attend at a fourth. Going to trade shows is a great way to find both vendors and potential prospects. Even in small shows, there can potentially be thousands of people walking through from all manner of businesses: suppliers, consumers, consultants, government officials, manufacturers’ reps, and more.

Exhibiting at a trade show can be more profitable than simply walking through one for a variety of reasons:


  •  The opportunity to speak to many more potential clients rather than only the ones who are exhibiting.
  •  The advertising potential from exposure in trade show magazines and other advertising media.
  • The opportunity to make a brand name for the company in markets where you can choose what association people make with your company.


For these reasons, Faspro Technologies has been attending trade shows since we opened our doors. We have only as of this year begun exhibiting at shows.  This decision has been highly beneficial to us and we will continue to exhibit at industry focused trade shows and events in the future.

The following is a list of our future appearances and of our recently attended shows where we exhibited or attended:


Near Future Exhibitions

Fabtech                                    Nov. 18-21, 2013         (Chicago, IL)
MD&M West                             Feb. 10-13, 2014          (Anaheim, CA)
MD&M East                               June 10-12, 2014         (New York, NY)


Previously Attended Conventions

MD&M East                                             (Philadelphia, PA)
MD&M Chicago                                      (Chicago, IL)
Milwaukee Manufacturers’ Expo            (Milwaukee, WI)
SMTA Trade Show                                 (Fort Worth, TX)
Made in Elk Grove                                 (Elk Grove Village, IL)

          

Man wounded early Friday in Summerdale   

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A 39-year-old man was shot in the leg around 12:45 a.m. Friday in the area of Summerdale Avenue and East Godfrey Avenue in the Summerdale section of Philadelphia. We have now tracked reports of more than 50 shooting victims in the city this month.

          

Leah Schade: Preaching in a time of Crisis from Corona to Climate   

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Dr. Leah Schade is Assistant Professor of Preaching and Worship at Lexington Theological Seminary, A graduate of the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia, her research and experience cover the fields of homiletics and ecological theology. As an ordained minister in the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America (ELCA), Schade has served in suburban, urban, and rural… Read more about Leah Schade: Preaching in a time of Crisis from Corona to Climate

          

Weekend Wrapup   

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Putting a bow on another eventful weekend in Pittsburgh sports:

1. As I watched Saturday night's Penguin game, I can't say I was surprised by the fact that the game went into OT. It was the fifth time in the past six games that's happened, and the seventh time in the past nine games. If these guys weren't already shorthanded, playing all that extra hockey at this point in the regular season couldn't help. 

Thankfully, the Pens' intestinal fortitude once again reared its head in the extra period, when Dustin Jeffrey scored his second goal of the game and seventh of the season at 1:52 of OT. The win meant the Penguins are a mere two points behind Philadelphia for the division (and conference) lead, and that, my friends, is simply unbelievable.

I know this season probably won't turn out the way we had all hoped once it started, but it won't be for a lack of effort. This team does the city proud every time it takes the ice. For them to even be in the playoff race considering what they've lost is a testament to the coaching of Dan Bylsma, the moves of Ray Shero, and the mental toughness present in that locker room.

2. Congrats go out to the Pitt Panthers, winners of the Big East regular season title and owners of a 27-4 record going into the postseason, after their victory over Villanova on Saturday. We're almost accustomed to such dominance after a decade of it, but I'm not too young to remember that this hasn't always been the case. Expectations may be raised, but the season should be considered a good one already.

Ashton Gibbs, who's had a great campaign, was just named First-Team All-Big East, only the ninth time a Panther has received such an honor. He joined Jerome Lane, Charles Smith, Brian Shorter, Brandin Knight, Chevy Troutman, Aaron Gray, Sam Young and DeJuan Blair by doing so. Gibbs leads the conference shooting 46.6 percent from 3-point range and 89.5 percent from the free-throw line, and has averaged 16.4 PPG. In addition to Gibbs, Brad Wanamaker got second-team honors, and deservedly so. The senior leads the Panthers in minutes played, free throws made, assist-to-turnover ratio and steals, and is second on the team in scoring, rebounding and field goals made.

While it's nice to see such individual honors coming this team's way, we all know that to the players, it won't mean as much without the Final Four trip that's eluded this program for so long. If ever there was a year when the sport was wide-open and the Panthers had as good a chance as anyone to win it all, this is it.
3. Speaking of local hoops, Robert Morris, sans Mike Rice, is back in the NEC title game with a 64-62 win over Quinnipiac thanks to a late jumper by sophomore Velton Jones. The Colonials, winners of eight straight, will play at Long Island University for the NEC championship at 7 p.m. Wednesday; the game will be televised by ESPN2. LIU is the tournament's #1 seed, while RMU sits third with an 18-13 overall mark. A win would be the Colonials' third straight trip to the NCAA tournament and first under coach Andrew Toole.

4. There's not much Steeler talk these days, thanks to the limbo-rific CBA discussions (which I have no interest talking about - at all). Most of the web chatter these days is about mock drafts, and the latest one I've seen (from Fox Sports) has the Steelers selecting Derek Sherrod, an OT from Mississippi State. The reasoning is as follows:
Though hardly considered the league’s gold standard last year,  the Steelers offensive line did a pretty darn good job protecting Ben Roethlisberger in 2010. Flozell Adams obviously isn’t the long-term answer at tackle, though, and two other big boys are set to become free agents if a new CBA is worked out. Pittsburgh should go offensive line with this pick. Enter the rather versatile Sherrod. The All-SEC performer helped pave the way for a Mississippi State rushing attack that averaged 227.6 yards per game in 2010. He’s a road paver who can play all over the line. If Sherrod’s still hanging around at No. 31, it’s a solid pickup for the AFC champs.
You're not going to have to sell me on the Steelers taking an offensive tackle.  Sherrod is ranked 30th overall in the insanely comprehensive 1,000-player ranking that CBS put together, so that would put his value right in line with where the Steelers would be making the pick.

5. The Pirates were busy over the weekend, but not in a good way. James McDonald struggled to find his rhythm in 2 2/3 innings, and was pulled due to his pitch count in a 5-0 loss to Toronto yesterday.

We've still got four weeks until Opening Day, so the hurler has some time to iron out the bugs. But make no doubt about it, McDonald is being counted on to play an integral part in this team's perennial hopes for a turnaround. He was falling behind in the count early and often yesterday and that was ultimately what led to his early shower; that's something he will have to clean up in the next few weeks.

Offensively, the Pirates were, well, the Pirates. The team totaled just four hits, with two coming from Pedro Alvarez. If this sounds like a familiar theme, you're not the only one saying so. "We've got work to do offensively," new manager Clint Hurdle said. "We knew that coming in."

The work-in-progress Buccos are back at it today at 1:05 against Tampa Bay at McKechnie Field.


          

Steelers Hire Carnell Lake   

Cache   



The Pittsburgh Steelers finally hired a secondary coach, and it is most certainly not Chuck Cecil.


That being said, Steeler fans should be elated at the alternative: former safety Carnell Lake, a five-time Pro Bowler and Steeler from 1989-1998. Lake is replacing Ray Horton, who took the Arizona Cardinals' defensive coordinator job after Ken Whisenhunt found out that Dick LeBeau and Keith Butler would not be available for the post. 

Lake, who retired in 2001 as a member of the Ravens (Ravens? I forgot about that.) had an internship with the Philadelphia Eagles in 2009 and coached the DBs at his alma mater, UCLA, later that season under Rick Neuheisel. This will be his first coaching job in the NFL. 

During his time with the Steelers, Lake started in Super Bowl XXX, was named to the 1990s NFL Team of the Decade, and was honored as the 1997 AFC Defensive Player of the Year, even getting a vote for MVP from Peter King.

Having Lake as another set of eyes on a secondary that features Troy Polamalu and is ultimately overseen by Dick LeBeau should be nothing but a good thing for the defending AFC Champions (although it would be better if they could keep Ike Taylor in the mix). Now let's hope the millionaires and billionaires can decide how to split their riches so we can see Lake's secondary in action in 2011.



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2020-08-14 21:42:13