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Buying My First Home As A Single Woman In Columbus Ga   

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By Rhonda Morrison So, I found myself divorced and in need of a home. The perfect home. Who would I call? The choices were many actually. My daughter went to [Read More]

          

Indy In-Tune #136: Grant McClintock   

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You think by now I'd give up trying to make New Years' resolutions.  Aside from the one about being nicer to my roommate, I've never actually managed to pull one off, though quite often for good reason.  This year, I am resolving 1) to get back into writing and playing music again, and 2) to find a way for seven years of hard work building Indy In-Tune and promoting the local music scene to at least pay for itself in a break even fashion.  Yeah, I jokingly say that, as a hobby, it's cheaper than heroin, but quite frankly I'd like to have what I have be self-sustaining, so that I can take that hobby budget and apply it towards expanding a bit.  You know, maybe better equipment, better swag, contests, something like that.  What's your resolution?  This week's guest is Grant McClintock and his as-yet-unnamed band.  Grant is a Pennsylvania transplant I first met back at our PodConcert #1 at Birdy's, courtesy of our mutual friends in Minute Details. What attracted me most his music was willingness to experiment with different sounds and instrumentation and push at the envelope of convention, yet still not break it to the point that you would call his music progressive or psychedelic (the instant stigmas of fanatic loyalty, but low mass appeal).  For this show, he performed all tracks live in Studio B, with his set being streamed live to the Internet at the time.  You can hear just the tracks (plus the between-song banter in our library. Links referenced in the show:          Grant McClintock can be found here | | His latest CD, Goldheart Oddball, which contains studio versions of three of the four tracks from tonight's show, can be purchased on his .  He comes to us via . You can learn more about the all-black metal band, , here.   Casting off the bad 80's fashion, Chelsea Redfern did the I was thinking of in the interview.  .  Really?  Never heard of it, but it sounds like a perfectly nice place to me. in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, as were Rush were inducted in 2002. Grant is a huge fan of , who apparently lives in Columbus, Ohio.

          

Качество сервиса 3PL, прозрачный грузовик и Логист.ру/2015   

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[simplenews-subscriber:user:profile-main:field-first-name], здравствуйте!

Форум «Логист.ру/2015» (25 июня, Москва, гостиница «Националь») -- финальные приготовления: https://Model.blue/splash/PqCAHEBphD_PLUS_izj0upsNX0qSE_SLASH_wvZ03pKUlIqc5G7x_PLUS_47g2cwDmfo9J0iimTNAf_SLASH_dPZfqTn6FECQr1mFoZyz8G61PrTpIALFW20mReoEGXLc_EQUALS#agenda.

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Призёры конкурса танка (短歌 -- короткая песня) на тему «Логистика и SCM»: https://Model.blue/splash/J1rAtPhRjZk5HzWiXFvgPqu0Fa6qo_SLASH_fSWy4w_PLUS_UUWfZ5JFI4ykumeNpGtWu2vNKzuH5SO_PLUS_yrJErK4C_SLASH_G9HcDvJ6aoDMn_SLASH_k23zNaS1IWQNPc4bb0RiEQJJp8sMy7T8uPiH.

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Еще 17 участников и на Фейсбуке нас будет 1000 -- https://Model.blue/splash/vdqo7Qeg8b_PLUS_uGqMsJ_PLUS_n4edLiZjxG1SA2J4x3To2l98pX6ofnsOKLXUdsu7liBdio_SLASH_d5HdEyylpKYDNV_SLASH_hh_PLUS_IE25KRyAKS7jgeKjSiF0txtvpj_PLUS_sW_SLASH_MERIoV4SHehFEvt.

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  • Как заочно оценить качество сервиса логистического провайдера? | Полина Винокурова

    Как заочно оценить качество сервиса логистического провайдера?Сегодня, по сравнению с кризисом 2008 года, многие клиенты по-другому смотрят на выбор логистического партнера. Все чаще на первое место выходит качество сервиса и репутация логистического оператора, и только потом обсуждаются коммерческие условия. Международные корпорации, как правило, проводят закрытые тендеры, приглашая к участию только надежных игроков, с проверенной репутацией. Однако, оценить заочно качество сервиса не просто. Мы расскажем об основных критериях, которые помогут в этом на примере нашей компании.
 
 
 
 
 
 
   
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Логист.ру/2015 — 25 июня

Логист.ру/2015 — 25 июня
Прозрачный грузовик

Прозрачный грузовик
Великий Шелковый Путь, программа «Дело» РБК

Великий Шелковый Путь, программа «Дело» РБК
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Менеджер по продажам

DSV Transport

Калининград

от 30 000 до 60 000 руб.
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от 80 000 руб.
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Белый Двор Т

Ростов-на-Дону

от (не указали) руб.
Специалист департамента продаж

ФПК-Логистика

Москва

от 20 000 до 80 000 руб.
Менеджер по перевозкам / транспортный логист

HR-Option

Москва (Шереметьево)

от 40 000 руб.


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a few north american events... (vancouver & columbus)   

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the dream

my time in van-groovy is totally groovy. the past 24 hours has shown me the wonders of a cohesive geek scene built on the same philosophy. it's amazing to see the hive buzz...

speaking of buzz, i'd hope that you'd take some time to come visit me at the following events in van-groovy and columbus.

bbq at bryght / raincity studios

thursday, 8 nov @ noon-thirty-ish
1 Alexander Street Suite 400, in Gastown close to Waterfront station

columbus blogger / social media club meeting
thursday, 15 nov @ 6.30 pm to 9ish (facebook info)
333 west broad st, c-bus, ohio


          

My North American Interview list / Travel plans   

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&t
the sunset rainbow

as i've cooled my jets, it pains me that i'm not going to take a road trip across america. since ciaro, i've realized that i haven't sat still in one city for more than four days... SF is one town where i know i can get a bunch of interviews, talk shop, and get some work done (edit video too). so instead of hoppin in a jaloppy, i'm going to bus, train and plane my way up and down the west coast and then fly to ohio. it really does make me sad, but it's what time, energy and money can afford.

the following is a list of people whom i'll try to interview. the list isn't complete so if you have any good peeps to recommend, holla at https://Model.blue/splash/Bq8AIMYdzy_PLUS_C0tDdZz16MpYQtqcbGMP2KtVZslqIp5cq9VzX2tuiouPFkBaMaC56m6UJ89b4B4PwqQ4mfYWk30mLgTFs0m82ZiMNg_SLASH_ZysxA_EQUALS


San Fransisco Metro Area

david cohn from new assignment / freelance networked journalism
eddie codel from the hat factory - sf coworking & vlogger
neil drumm - advomatic, drupal, hack4dean
craig newmark from craigslist
darian rodriguez-heyman from Craigslist foundation
amit gupta from photojojo and "work at jelly"
colin brumelle from MixedContent LLC & drupal and ruby on rails developer
zack rosen from Chaper Three LLC, drupal association & mission bicycles - a SF bike startup
chris & tara from Citizen Agency / barcamp / coworking / online grassroot communities
schlomo rabinowitz - coworker, vlogger, socialite
erica olsen - second lifer
tantek celik - microformats & open standards
brad neuberg - coworking originator & programmer
ben rigby - Mobile Voter
david sasaki - outreach director of global voices

TRANSPORTATION
OAK to SEA - $180
Thursday, Nov 01
Flight: 1232
Departs: OAKLAND CA (OAK) at 2:20 PM
Arrives: SEATTLE TACOMA WA (SEA) at 4:15 PM

Seattle, WA
Gregory Heller - Drupal, CivicActions, EFF's defective by design campaign
Office Nomads - Coworking Space opening on 1 Nov

TRANSPORTATION
Seattle to Vancouver
Train: 510 Cascades
Monday, Nov 05
Departs: Seattle, WA (SEA) 7:40 am
Arrives: Vancouver, BC (VAC) 11:35 am

Vancouver, BC
Michael Meyers and Michael Tippett from NowPublic.com & citizen journalism hounds
Robert Scales from Rain City Studios - Barcamp Organizer, Drupal
Boris Mann from bryght and Drupal Association
Kris Krug - flickr photographer & president of bryght
Workspace - a coworking facility

TRANSPORTATION

Vancouver to LA
Bus: 8911
Friday, Nov 9
Departs: Vancouver, BC (VAC) 5:30 am
Arrives: Seattle, WA (SEA) 9:15 am

Train: 11 Coast Starlight
Departs: Seattle, WA (SEA) 9:45 am
Arrives: Los Angeles, CA - Union Station (LAX) 9:00 pm on 10-NOV-07

LA, CA
photohunt with julia
zadi and steve wolf from the jetset show
micki krimmel from revver / world changing
Halcyon from Hug Nation
Jerad - Movie director, Vlogger
julian bleecker - scholar and researcher
ben cerveny - theorist & philosopher
tony katz - radio personality
scott smith - programmer

TRANSPORTATION

BUR to CMH
Thursday, Nov 15
Flight: 223
Departs: Los Angeles (Burbank, CA) at 8:54 AM
Arrives: Columbus, OH at 3:58 PM

Dayton, Ohio
family time...


          

Arts Preview: CCAD Senior Fashion Show   

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CCAD’s annual Senior Fashion Show is not simply the culmination of four years of design training for students, but also evidence of a symbiotic relationship that is helping to drive the continuing development of Columbus as a fashion hub.

If the presence of established corporate fashion and the increasing proliferation of indie designers help inform the training of young designers at CCAD and other institutions, those young designers are, in turn, building on the city’s existing reputation and moving it forward in new, exciting directions.

“There is a great access to talent here. Having corporations that bring people here to work who stay here and maybe move on to a boutique or create their own collection provides students with real feedback from professionals,” CCAD Fashion Design Chair Suzanne Cotton said. “Our program brings a lot of people here, many not just to study but also to stay here and create.”

The designers featured in this year’s show bring varied approaches conceptually, aesthetically and technically. Jacob Maitland’s eveningwear pieces are luxurious and elaborate. Jiaqi Kou’s looks are inspired by her Chinese heritage and feature her own hand-dyed fabrics in wool, linen and cotton. Sheri Wu’s “Resonance” looks to draw inspiration from her treatment for a brain tumor (“Resonance” as in, Magnetic Resonance Imaging), including a custom fabric she modelled on her own brain scans. Lauren Metelitz’s looks feature more than a hint of Spanish style, with nods to matadors and flamenco dancers in all black material.

“Matadors wear these beautiful, custom-tailored clothes and then go out and do what they do, which feels like a tragedy, so that’s why my collection is all black,” Metelitz said. “I used all different textures — lots of different kinds of fabrics — and incorporated hardware and fringe.

Metelitz said she was going for a look that was “more daring, something really interesting.”

“We strive, as a department, to encourage students to develop their own aesthetic. The goal is to develop the creative designer mind,” Cotton said. “If you can create your own process, you can be successful.”

Each year, once collections are selected for the show and pieces finished, the students complete a design study unrelated to their collections. This year, Cotton said, she decided to explore the issue of sustainability as it related to fashion.

“Sustainability is becoming more and more important in our industry, looking at processes and asking ‘Are we being responsible?’” she said.

Cotton invited fashion designer and visionary Celeste Malvar-Stewart to discuss her favorite topic with the students.

“This was the highlight of my year so far,” Malvar-Stewart said.

Since moving to Columbus about three years ago, Malvar-Stewart’s commitment to exploring sustainable fashion has increased, as she connected with local farms for fiber and foraged for locally-made dyes.

“People have this image when you say ‘sustainable fashion’ of wearing burlap sacks,” she said, only half-joking. “The challenge for these young designers is how to create beautiful pieces within a sustainable model, without compromising design. I wanted to come in and make students aware of every aspect of the design process.”

Related:graziaaustralia.com

Among the sustainable projects was Metelitz’s white dress design, created from used dryer sheets.

“At first I was trying to do something with lint, to try and show how these microfibers wash away every time you clean your clothing,” she said. “Celeste gave me this big bag of lint and dryer sheets, which are also unsustainable. I started ironing the sheets and then cut them into smaller squares and sewed them into rolls. It looked like a brick pattern. So now I have this simple, elegant dress made completely from dryer sheets.”

Metelitz admitted the dryer sheet dress is “an awareness piece.” “I don’t know that people are going to wear dryer sheets,” she said.

“It’s so lovely,” Malvar-Stewart said of the dress, adding, “All of the students made these really innovative pieces.”

The sustainable pieces will be displayed on mannequins in the party area of the fashion show. Meanwhile, the collections will be modeled on the runway at CCAD’s Design Studios on Broad. A VIP reception kicks off the Friday event, followed by the show itself at 8 p.m. Doors open at 7:30 p.m. for general admission. VIP tickets also include a post-show party and admission to the Jazz Lounge. General admission also includes the after-party.

Related:plus size formal dresses australia


          

In Memoriam   

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In Memoriam

dlsperry94 Mon, 08/10/2020 - 21:07
Nazarene News Staff

The following is a weekly listing of Nazarene ministers and leaders who recently went home to be with the Lord. Notices were received 10-14 August 2020.

Evelyn Beard, 74, of Columbus, Ohio, passed away 2 August 2020. She was the wife of Wayne Beard, a retired minister who served in Ohio. 

Fay Burnside, 90, of Denton, Texas, passed away 2 August 2020. She was the widow of Arthur Burnside, a retired minister who served in West Virginia and Illinois. Arthur passed away in 2006.

Fern Grimm, 83, of Lancaster, Ohio, passed away 1 August 2020. She was the wife of retired minister Lloyd Grimm Jr., who served in Ohio. 

Minnie Gates, 86, of Lewiston, Idaho, passed away 7 August 2020. She was a retired minister, serving in Montana and Washington. She was preceded in death by her husband, retired minister Ernest Gates, who served in Montana and Washington. Ernest passed away in 1999.

Lorri Harrison, 70, of Crawford, Nebraska, passed away 1 August 2020. She was the wife of Rick Harrison, a retired minister who served in California and Nebraska. 

Dale Harvey, 97, of Mount Pleasant, Michigan, passed away 5 August 2020. He was a retired minister, serving in Oregon, Ohio, and Michigan. He is survived by his wife, Eleanor Harvey.

Glenn Kell, 68, of Katy, Texas, passed away 6 August 2020. He was a retired minister and missionary, serving in Zambia, Kenya, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, and Texas. He is survived by his wife, Peggy Kell.

Jonathan Bruce Lewis, 74, of Live Oak, California, passed away 11 August 2020. He was the pastor of Live Oak Church of the Nazarene, and previously served in Nebraska, and Oregon. He is survived by his wife, Angela Lewis.

Mary Meadows, 97, of Kaulua, Hawaii, passed away 30 July 2020. She was the widow of Hal Meadows, a retired minister who served in Wisconsin, Virginia, Hawaii, and Colorado. Hal passed away in 2018.

Joyce Seal, 88, of Castle Rock, Colorado, passed away 22 July 2020. She was the wife of William Seal, a retired minister who served in Oregon, California, and Colorado. 

S. Wayne Smith, 88, of Gold Canyon, Arizona, passed away 8 August 2020. He was a retired minister who served in Indiana, Ohio, and Maine. He is survived by his wife, Marjorie A. Smith.

Christine Turnbull, 84, of Gaylord, Michigan, passed away 25 July 2020. She was the wife of Edward Turnbull, a retired minister who served in Michigan.

For previous editions of In Memoriam, see the "Passings" section by clicking here.

Note: Please join us in prayer for the families who have lost loved ones. Click on names for full stories, funeral information, local online obituaries, and/or guest books (if available). To submit an entry of a minister or church leader, send to news@nazarene.org.

--Compiled by Nazarene News

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Mountain Stormy Skies

          

Global Stamping Friends - Colour Challenge!    

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Welcome to the 19th Bloghop of Stampin' Up! lovers from around the world.  It is hard to believe that I asked some strangers at the time to join me and look where we are now!

This month's bloghop is a colour challenge.



Just gorgeous colours and I was excited as Lemon Lime Twist and Island Indigo as two of my all time favourite colours.  I also only used those 2 are I realised my colour caddy is missing Early Espresso - might need to rectify that one!

My project is inspired on one Tracy May, did some time ago. I happened to come across it by chance and fell in love with it. She used traditional pink but I decided to take some liberty with the flamingo - I'm sure if they ate blueberries rather than shrimps they'd be blue!

Here is my Island Indigo and Lemon Lime twist Flamingo!






I adore it!  In this version I just let the water bleed naturally whereas in the one below I used a tissue after the water was spritzed. Two different looks and I love them both.


The, how I did it, is right at the bottom, but I don't want to stop you from hopping around all the fantastic projects so feel free to leave me here and hop onto Jan's project and come back if you'd like more information.


https://Model.blue/splash/wq4htd17Kt33gsJmh5G9a6rUgHijOPeG3C3HFIL6drE_SLASH_XBnj_PLUS_T9yz_PLUS_P7TfBe_SLASH_ok8yGZES8IvJ1civUyl1Ob9QMHZJVMySayor2W4thfzmkmjWvxnm3VIMeRC_PLUS_8vlPS7JUkNR6tqFc1Q_PLUS_rZ58VwK4e46XknuqD7OyVkfslIKb5ne_PLUS_5g_SLASH_GAAhng3J6x2PxtSD_SLASH_


Happy Crafting

Sarah
xx


2018 FEBRUARY BLOG ROLL
1.       Jan Musselman 
2.       Karie Beglau 
3.       Libby Dyson
4.       Lisa Ann Bernard 
5.       Anastasia Radloff 
6.       Tricia Butts 
7.       Amanda Bates 
8.       Mary Ann Kay Rossiter
9.       Claudia Perry
18.   Sarah Mcdermott You are Here





How'd I do it?

I stamped first in Lemon Lime Twist and then on top with Island Indigo and pressed a little harder on one side of the stamp to let some of the Lemon Lime come through.  I also masked the bottom the legs so that the Lemon Lime was the only colour on those. To line them up of course I used our famous Stamp-a-ma-jig, a wonderful tool.

It took me a few goes to get to right and my top tips are;
Use watercolour paper, not shimmery white- the water just spread too much for me on the shimmery white
Use a little spritzed water first, the ink spreads further then you think
Use a tissue if you want to stop the water spreading and pooling in places
Finally, have fun with it!











          

Stunt Granny Audio Presents – OHPA 166 – Sheetz, SpaceX and Aliens   

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Kevin DiFrango/ Stunt Granny LTD Ken & Kevin got together to talk about their beloved Altoona PA original, Sheetz, and how it may be coming to a location very familiar to them in the actual city of Columbus. Would you want to live behind a strip mall, a bank and a gas station? Would this […]

The post Stunt Granny Audio Presents – OHPA 166 – Sheetz, SpaceX and Aliens appeared first on Stunt Granny.


          

Stunt Granny Audio Presents – OHPA 168 – A Skoolie Named Buttercup, De-funding the Police and Flavortown OH   

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Kevin DiFrango/ Stunt Granny LTD Ken & Kevin are back after a week off and they’re ready to get serious. They talk about “The Curious Case of The Colorful School Bus” which is from columbusalive.com. What is a skoolie? The skoolie named Buttercup was involved in the Black Lives Matter protest in downtown Columbus. This […]

The post Stunt Granny Audio Presents – OHPA 168 – A Skoolie Named Buttercup, De-funding the Police and Flavortown OH appeared first on Stunt Granny.


          

X Marks the Spot: Remembering “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” on its 25th Anniversary   

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Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade

“There was no way for Spielberg to top himself, and perhaps it is just as well that Last Crusade will indeed be Indy's last film. It would be too sad to see the series grow old and thin, like the James Bond movies.” — Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

The Digital Bits is pleased to present this retrospective commemorating the silver anniversary of the release of Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, George Lucas & Steven Spielberg’s third entry in the popular Indiana Jones movie series starring Harrison Ford as everyone’s favorite archaeologist-adventurer.

The Bits celebrates the occasion with this retrospective featuring a compilation of box-office data that places the movie’s performance in context, quotes from well-known movie critics, production and exhibition information, and a list of the 70-millimeter “showcase” presentations.

The article also features an interview segment with a quartet of film historians (found on Page 2), who discuss the attributes of the movie and whether or not it has endured. [Read on here…]

Indy & Henry amid fire

 

INDIANA JONES NUMBER$

  • 1 = Rank among top-grossing movies during opening weekend
  • 1 = Rank among top-grossing movies of 1989 (worldwide)
  • 2 = Number of weeks nation’s top-grossing movie
  • 2 = Rank among top-grossing movies of 1989 (domestic)
  • 2 = Rank among top-grossing movies of 1989 (summer season)
  • 3 = Rank among Paramount’s top-grossing movies of all time at close of run
  • 9 = Number of months between theatrical release and home-video release
  • 9 = Rank among top-grossing movies of the 1980s
  • 11 = Rank on all-time list of top-grossing movies at close of original run
  • 19 = Number of days to gross $100 million*
  • 27.7 = Percentage of second-week decrease in box-office gross
  • 99 = Rank on current list of all-time top-grossing movies (domestic, adjusted for inflation)
  • 145 = Rank on current list of all-time top-grossing movies (worldwide)
  • 155 = Rank on current list of all-time top-grossing movies (domestic)
  • 202 = Number of 70mm prints
  • 2,327 = Number of theaters showing the movie during opening weekend

Indiana Jones Trade Ad

  • $5.6 million = Opening-day box-office gross
  • $11.2 million = Highest single-day gross (May 27)*
  • $29.4 million = Opening weekend box-office gross (3-day, May 26-28)*
  • $37.1 million = Opening weekend box-office gross (4-day holiday, May 26-29)*
  • $46.9 million = Opening week box-office gross (6-day, May 24-29)*
  • $50.2 million = Opening week box-office gross (7-day, May 24-30)*
  • $55.4 million = Production cost
  • $106.3 million = Production cost (adjusted for inflation)
  • $115.5 million = Domestic box-office rental (% of gross exhibitors paid to distributor)
  • $197.2 million = Domestic box-office gross
  • $206.5 million = International box-office rental (% of gross exhibitors paid to distributor)
  • $277.0 million = International box-office gross
  • $322.0 million = Worldwide box-office rental (% of gross exhibitors paid to distributor)
  • $401.3 million = Domestic box-office gross (adjusted for inflation)
  • $474.2 million = Worldwide box-office gross
  • $528.6 million = International box-office gross (adjusted for inflation)
  • $904.9 million = Worldwide box-office gross (adjusted for inflation)

*Established new industry record

The film crew

 

A SAMPLING OF MOVIE REVIEWER QUOTES

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade is the kind of movie that gives pure no-apologies entertainment a good name. It’s a beautiful machine, thought out and revved up to the last detail, with no other purpose but to delight—and it delights.” — Mick LaSalle, San Francisco Chronicle

“If this new Indiana Jones movie makes a large number of millions at the yahoo box offices, well, then you’ve been had. Every magazine and TV station in the world has been trumpeting stories about this latest epic, which is no more than a well-photographed and not-very-tightly-edited series of fights. Fights on top of tanks, railroads, cliffs, power boats, usually involving Indiana Jones versus a lot of not so funny Nazis. Show me a funny Nazi and I’ll give you five bucks! Depressing and expensive trash hyped to the max.” — Gary Franklin, KABC-TV, Los Angeles

“Did anyone seriously doubt that this would be anything but one of the absolute highlights of the summer?” — Bob Curtwright, The Wichita Eagle-Beacon

“The duet between father and son, and between two actors who always seem to have mischief in their eyes, is the brilliant twist on which the film will live or die. The very idea of Mr. Connery as Indiana’s father seems too delicious to be true.” — Caryn James, The New York Times

“Loud, brutal and infantile, Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade is a declaration of artistic and even moral imbecility. It is all plot without story, all action without life.” — David Elliott, The San Diego Union

“It’s moviemaking in its purest, most spectacular form.” — Jim Verniere, Boston Herald

Indy and Henry“Of all the directors working in the movies today, Steven Spielberg has the truest instincts for keeping an audience visually engaged, plugged in. This is his great gift—to put us inside his movies—and at his best, his natural command of the simple mechanics of storytelling, of editing and camera movements and pacing, enables him to evoke a kind of pop transcendence that comes close to the effect of the higher, classical arts. The greatest of his films are pure, pop epiphanies, exhilarating, innocent and uniquely, indelibly his own. Somehow, though, they are your own, too, and the great disappointment of Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, the largely irrelevant third and (supposedly) final installment in the hair-raising adventures of the superarcheologist, is that it seems to be neither yours nor his…. The first of Spielberg’s films to make us feel heavy in our seats, the first to leave us sitting, passive and uninvolved, on the outside. Watching it, you feel that nearly anyone could have directed it.” — Hal Hinson, The Washington Post

“This deliberately old-fashioned Saturday matinee yarn has everything money can buy, but never really generates a sense of wonder and excitement. A definite improvement over the second Indiana Jones outing, but it still bears the mark of one too many trips to the well.” — Leonard Maltin, Entertainment Tonight

“What can you say about a movie that is as fine-tuned as an Indianapolis 500 race car and travels at the same speed? You could play the cynic and say it is an outrageous piece of audience manipulation. Or, you could say that it is a thrilling exercise in pure cinema. Why not the latter?” — Bob Thomas, Associated Press

“Although this production is exceedingly well made, save for a rousing ending, I wanted more. More humanity…more wit…more laughs. I wanted more of a film like the original Raiders of the Lost Ark.” — Gene Siskel, Siskel & Ebert & the Movies

“Sean Connery (the original James Bond) simply IS Henry Jones Sr.—the telling glances that pass between the two, their mannerisms and grudging respect for each other make this father-son team believable and hilarious.” — Linda Cook, (Davenport) Quad-City Times

“It wobbles at a great rate of speed over a spectacularly bumpy course of adventure, like an old-fashioned touring car with one wheel slightly out of line, suddenly soars in the air with childlike delight and sometimes crashes, only to explode in laughter.” — Vincent Canby, The New York Times

“The greatest adventure in film history.” — Jack Garner, Gannett News Service

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade is a lively, robust entertainment that serves as a fitting way hang up its hero’s fedora and bullwhip. It also proves something director Steven Spielberg that may well be coming to grips with. Movies, even popcorn-poppers like this one, ultimately stay with us in spite of trickery and finesse, and because of character, imagination and style. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade has state-of-the-art stunts and effects, a smorgasbord of dramatic locations and just about all the Spielbergian bebop you can take. In the end, though, the movie wins you over because Harrison Ford has a, witty partner—the great Sean Connery, in the role of Dr. Henry Jones, Indiana Jones’ single-minded father.” — David Foil, (Baton Rouge) State Times Advocate

“It’s Spielberg’s wide-eyed enthusiasm that turns The Last Crusade into the wildest and wittiest Indy of them all.” — Peter Travers, Rolling Stone

“To say that Paramount’s Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade may be the best film ever made for 12-year-olds is not a backhanded compliment. What was conceived as a child’s dream of a Saturday matinee serial has evolved into a moving excursion into religious myth.” — Joseph McBride, Variety

“Spielberg’s robustly articulate visualization, as well as the film’s magnificently evocative effects are, in Lucasfilm-speak, the ultimate Forces of Good here.” — Duane Byrge, The Hollywood Reporter

“Despite strong acting (the slapstick energy between Ford and Connery is wasted), obligatory chases and stunts and splendid art direction, the virtuoso technique evident in every frame remains formulaic—unaccompanied by revelation, epiphany or surprise.” — TV Guide

“The relaxed and confident Crusade is the first Jones outing to benefit from actual characterizations.” — Mike Clark, USA Today

“The action simply doesn't have the exhilarating, leaping precision that Spielberg gave us in the past. The joyous sureness is missing.” — Pauline Kael, The New Yorker

“Steven Spielberg’s new Indiana Jones opus is highly-recommended for armchair adventurers of all ages. It’s not quite as good or as off-handedly rugged as Raiders of the Lost Ark, but it’s a darn sight better than the forced and overproduced Temple of Doom.” — Glenn Lovell, San Jose Mercury News

“You can't roll monstrous boulders straight at audiences anymore and have a whole theater-full duck and gasp with fright—and pleasure. We may be plumb gasped out. And although Harrison Ford is still in top form and the movie is truly fun in patches, it's a genre on the wane.” — Sheila Benson, Los Angeles Times

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade may not heed its hero’s advice about the proper approach to archaeological pursuits, but it’s certainly learned the lessons of the first two pictures well. It may not seem as fresh as Raiders (how can it, eight years later?) or be as visually inventive as Temple of Doom, but Last Crusade has more heart (and we’re not talking about the organ the Grand Poobah pulled from the sacrificial victim’s chest in part two) than either of them.” — Jim Emerson, The Orange County Register

Indy 3 is the same, different and better. Indiana Jones’ last and best crusade.” — Richard Corliss, Time

“Predictable is the film's simplistic treatment of themes from religion and myth. It's curious that Spielberg and Lucas see these venerated objects not as symbols of divine inspiration but as repositories of a blind, undiscriminating force that can be wielded (like the three wishes from a genie or a magic lamp) by whoever gets their hands on them.” — David Sterritt, The Christian Science Monitor

“The opening sequence of this third Indiana Jones movie is the only one that seems truly original—or perhaps I should say, it recycles images from 1940s pulps and serials that Spielberg has not borrowed before. The rest of the movie will not come as a surprise to students of Indiana Jones, but then how could it? The Jones movies by now have defined a familiar world of death-defying stunts, virtuoso chases, dry humor and the quest for impossible goals in unthinkable places. When Raiders of the Lost Ark appeared, it defined a new energy level for adventure movies; it was a delirious breakthrough. But there was no way for Spielberg to top himself, and perhaps it is just as well that Last Crusade will indeed be Indy's last film. It would be too sad to see the series grow old and thin, like the James Bond movies…. If there is just a shade of disappointment after seeing this movie, it has to be because we will never again have the shock of this material seeming new. Raiders of the Lost Ark, now more than ever, seems a turning point in the cinema of escapist entertainment, and there was really no way Spielberg could make it new all over again. What he has done is to take many of the same elements, and apply all of his craft and sense of fun to make them work yet once again.” — Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

 

TRIVIA + PRODUCTION & EXHIBITION INFORMATION

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade poster (version 1)

During the week of the film’s release, the leather jacket and fedora worn by Harrison Ford were donated to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade was the first in the series to be rated PG-13, due at least in part to the controversy surrounding the previous two movies’ PG rating.

Box-office records…. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade established an opening-weekend box-office record with a gross of $29.4 million (3-day) and $37.1 million (4-day holiday), breaking the 3-day weekend record of $26.3 million set two years earlier by Beverly Hills Cop II and 4-day holiday weekend record of $33.9 set five years earlier by Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom…. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade established an opening-week box-office record with a gross of $46.9 million (6-day) and $50.2 million (7-day), breaking the 6-day record of $42.3 million and 7-day record of $45.7 set five years earlier by Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom…. Last Crusade was the first movie to gross more than $10 million in a single day, a feat accomplished on its fourth day of release (May 27) and again on its fifth day (May 28)…. Last Crusade broke the record for shortest amount of time to cross the $100 million mark, a feat attained in 19 days (the previous record holder, Return of the Jedi, accomplished the feat in 23 days)…. Last Crusade’s opening-day gross of $5.6 million was the third-highest, falling just short of Return of the Jedi’s $6.2 million record set in 1983 and Rocky IV’s $5.7 million second-highest mark set in 1985…. Last Crusade broke the opening-day house record at the fabled Grauman’s Chinese Theater with a take of $40,317.

Doctor Fantasy’s Magic Caboose, featured in the prologue, is an “appearance” by producer Frank Marshall which continued a pattern established by the two earlier movies in the series. (In Raiders, Marshall played the German Flying Wing pilot, and in Temple of Doom Marshall appeared as a sailor riding a rickshaw during the Shanghai chase scene.)

Indiana Jones’ full name, inspired by series creator George Lucas, was revealed during this film: Henry Walton Jones, Jr. (George Walton Lucas, Jr….)

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade had a theatrical-to-video “window” of nine months. In comparison, Raiders took 30 months and Temple of Doom took 28 months. (Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull was released to the home-video market in five months.)

Last Crusade was released on a record seven home-video formats on February 1, 1990: Beta, VHS, Spanish-subtitled VHS, Super-VHS, 8mm, LaserDisc (letterboxed), LaserDisc (pan-and-scan). It was subsequently released on DVD in 2003 and on Blu-ray Disc in 2012.

Last Crusade was Paramount’s first Super-VHS release and their first letterboxed release on the LaserDisc format.

Pat Roach was the only actor aside from Harrison Ford to appear in all three of the ’80s Indiana Jones movies. Roach played a Gestapo in Last Crusade, the Chief Guard in Temple of Doom, and had a dual role in Raiders as the Giant Sherpa in the Nepal sequence and the 1st Mechanic in the Flying Wing sequence.

Last Crusade was the ninth feature film of Spielberg’s scored by John Williams. (Spielberg & Williams are among the most prolific director-composer collaborations, with Williams providing the music to 26 of Spielberg’s 27¼ theatrical feature films plus some television and special interest projects.)

Last Crusade earned composer John Williams his 26th Academy Award nomination and marked the eighth time he was nominated for two films in the same year. As well, Williams earned his 21st Grammy nomination, and won a BMI Film & TV Award.

The first coming attractions trailer for Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, a teaser featuring behind-the-scenes footage, was issued in November 1988. A second trailer was issued during spring ’89. The trailers issued by Paramount and recommended to be screened with presentations of Indiana Jones were Black Rain, Let it Ride and Star Trek V: The Final Frontier.

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade was among only 17 first-run movies and three classic re-issues released during 1989 with 70-millimeter prints for selected engagements. The premium-format prints were made at a cost of approximately $10,000 each (compared to approximately $1,500 for a 35mm print). Large-format 70mm presentations were typically superior to conventional 35mm (regardless of origination format) because the larger print allowed a sharper, brighter and steadier projected image and its magnetic soundtrack provided discrete channels of audio with exceptional fidelity.

The movie’s 70mm print order was the third-largest for a North American feature-film release. Only 2010 and Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom had more large-format prints struck for a single release.

Awards…. Last Crusade was nominated for three Academy Awards: Original Score, Sound and Sound Effects Editing, winning the latter. Sean Connery was nominated for a Golden Globe and a BAFTA. Williams’ score was nominated for a Grammy. The movie was nominated for four Saturn Awards and won a Hugo for Best Dramatic Presentation. The DVD release was nominated for three Golden Satellite Awards and two DVD Exclusive Awards.

 

THE 70MM ENGAGEMENTS

Last Crusade newspaper ad

The following is a list of the first-run 70mm Six-Track Dolby Stereo premium-format presentations of Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade in the United States and Canada. These were, arguably, the best theaters in which to experience Indiana Jones and the only way to faithfully hear the original audio mix. Only about ten percent of the film’s print run was in the deluxe 70mm format. The noise-reduction and signal-processing format for the majority of the movie’s large-format prints was Dolby “A,” while a few prints (noted in the list below) were in Dolby “SR” (Spectral Recording). As well, Paramount booked the movie in as many Lucasfilm THX-certified venues as possible.

So, which theaters screened the 70mm version of Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade? Read on….

Note: The list does not include any 70mm mid-run upgrade, move-over, sub-run, re-release or international engagements, nor does it include any of the movie’s thousands of standard 35mm engagements.

** shown in 70mm on two screens

*** shown in 70mm on three screens

 

ALABAMA

  • Hoover – Cobb GALLERIA 10

ALASKA

  • Anchorage – Luxury Theatres FIREWEED 7 <THX>

ALBERTA

  • Calgary – Famous Players CHINOOK
  • Calgary – Famous Players SUNRIDGE 5
  • Edmonton – Famous Players LONDONDERRY TWIN
  • Edmonton – Famous Players PARAMOUNT <THX>

ARIZONA

  • Mesa – Mann SUPERSTITION 5
  • Phoenix – Harkins CINE CAPRI
  • Phoenix – Mann CHRIS-TOWN 5 <THX>
  • Tucson – Mann GALLERIA 6 <THX>

ARKANSAS

  • Little Rock – United Artists CINEMA 150

BRITISH COLUMBIA

  • Burnaby – Famous Players LOUGHEED MALL 3
  • Burnaby – Famous Players STATION SQUARE 7 <THX>
  • Vancouver – Famous Players STANLEY
  • Victoria – Famous Players CAPITOL 6

CALIFORNIA

  • Anaheim – SoCal CINEMAPOLIS 10
  • Berkeley – Cinerama BERKELEY
  • Burlingame – Syufy HYATT 3
  • Carlsbad – SoCal PLAZA CAMINO REAL 4
  • City of Industry – Mann PUENTE HILLS 6 <THX>
  • Corte Madera – Cinerama CINEMA <SR>
  • Costa Mesa – Edwards SOUTH COAST PLAZA TRIPLEX
  • Daly City – Cineplex Odeon PLAZA TWIN <THX>
  • Hayward – Mann FESTIVAL 9 <THX>
  • Huntington Beach – Edwards CHARTER CENTRE 5
  • La Mesa – Pacific GROSSMONT MALL TRIPLEX
  • La Mirada – Pacific LA MIRADA 6
  • Laguna Hills – Edwards/SoCal LAGUNA HILLS MALL TRIPLEX
  • Lakewood – Pacific LAKEWOOD CENTER 4
  • Long Beach – United Artists MOVIES 6
  • Los Angeles (Hollywood) – Mann CHINESE TRIPLEX <SR> <THX>
  • Los Angeles (North Hollywood) – Syufy CENTURY 7 <THX>
  • Los Angeles (Northridge) – Pacific NORTHRIDGE 6
  • Los Angeles (Tarzana) – Mann VALLEY WEST 6
  • Los Angeles (Westwood Village) – Mann NATIONAL <SR> <THX>
  • Los Angeles (Woodland Hills) – Pacific TOPANGA TWIN
  • Mission Viejo – Edwards CROWN VALLEY 5
  • Montclair – Pacific MONTCLAIR TRIPLEX
  • Mountain View – Syufy CENTURY 10
  • National City – Pacific SWEETWATER 6
  • Newport Beach – Edwards NEWPORT TRIPLEX
  • Oakland – Cinerama PIEDMONT 3
  • Orange – Syufy CENTURY CINEDOME 8**
  • Oxnard – Pacific CARRIAGE SQUARE 5
  • Palm Desert – Metropolitan TOWN CENTER 7
  • Pasadena – Pacific HASTINGS 5
  • Pleasant Hill – Syufy CENTURY 5
  • Riverside – SoCal CANYON CREST 9
  • Sacramento – Syufy CENTURY 6
  • Sacramento – Syufy CENTURY CINEDOME 8
  • San Bernardino – Pacific INLAND CENTER 5
  • San Diego – Mann 9 AT THE GROVE <THX>
  • San Francisco – Blumenfeld REGENCY I
  • San Francisco – Blumenfeld REGENCY II
  • San Jose – Syufy CENTURY 22 TRIPLEX***
  • Santa Barbara – Metropolitan ARLINGTON
  • Temple City – Edwards TEMPLE 4
  • Torrance – Mann OLD TOWNE 6
  • Universal City – Cineplex Odeon UNIVERSAL CITY 18 <THX>

Newspaper ad

COLORADO

  • Aurora – United Artists COOPER 5
  • Denver – Mann CENTURY 21 <THX>

CONNECTICUT

  • East Hartford – National Amusements SHOWCASE CINEMAS
  • Orange – National Amusements SHOWCASE CINEMAS
  • Stamford – Trans-Lux RIDGEWAY TWIN

DELAWARE

There were no 70mm engagements in Delaware.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

  • Washington – Kogod-Burka CINEMA 

FLORIDA

  • Boca Raton – Wometco SHADOWOOD 12 <THX>
  • Miami – American Multi-Cinema KENDALL TOWN & COUNTRY 10
  • North Miami – Muvico CALIFORNIA CLUB 6 <THX>
  • North Miami Beach – Wometco 167TH STREET TWIN
  • Orlando – American Multi-Cinema FASHION VILLAGE 8
  • St. Petersburg – American Multi-Cinema CROSSROADS 8 <THX>
  • Sunrise – Wometco 8 AT WESTON <THX>
  • Tampa – Cineplex Odeon HILLSBORO 8 <THX>

GEORGIA

  • Atlanta – United Artists LENOX SQUARE 6
  • Duluth – United Artists THE MOVIES AT GWINNETT PLAZA
  • Kennesaw – Storey TOWN 8
  • Savannah – United Artists TARA 4
  • Tucker – American Multi-Cinema NORTHLAKE FESTIVAL 8

HAWAII

  • Honolulu – Consolidated WAIKIKI 3 <HPS-4000>

IDAHO

There were no 70mm engagements in Idaho.

ILLINOIS

  • Chicago – Cineplex Odeon BIOGRAPH 3
  • Evanston – Marks & Rosenfield EVANSTON 5
  • Hillside – Marks & Rosenfield HILLSIDE SQUARE 6
  • Lansing – Marks & Rosenfield RIVER RUN 8
  • Lombard – General Cinema Corporation YORKTOWN 6 <THX>
  • Niles – Cineplex Odeon GOLF MILL 3
  • Norridge – Marks & Rosenfield NORRIDGE 10
  • Northbrook – Cineplex Odeon EDENS 2
  • Schaumburg – Cineplex Odeon WOODFIELD 9
  • Woodbridge – General Cinema Corporation WOODGROVE FESTIVAL 6 <THX>

INDIANA

  • Indianapolis – Loews COLLEGE PARK 8

IOWA

There were no 70mm engagements in Iowa.

KANSAS

  • Overland Park – American Multi-Cinema OAK PARK PLAZA 6

KENTUCKY

  • Louisville – National Amusements SHOWCASE CINEMAS

LOUISIANA

There were no 70mm engagements in Louisiana.

70mm film frame

MAINE

There were no 70mm engagements in Maine.

MANITOBA

  • Winnipeg – Famous Players PORTAGE PLACE 3

MARYLAND

  • Baltimore – Durkee SENATOR
  • Bethesda – Kogod-Burka MONTGOMERY MALL 3
  • Woodlawn – General Cinema Corporation SECURITY SQUARE 8 <THX>

MASSACHUSETTS

  • Boston – Loews CHERI TRIPLEX
  • Seekonk – National Amusements SHOWCASE CINEMAS
  • West Springfield – National Amusements SHOWCASE CINEMAS
  • Worcester – National Amusements SHOWCASE CINEMAS

MICHIGAN

  • Dearborn – United Artists THE MOVIES AT FAIRLANE**
  • Harper Woods – American Multi-Cinema EASTLAND 2
  • Lansing – United Artists SPARTAN TRIPLEX
  • Southfield – American Multi-Cinema AMERICANA 8
  • Sterling Heights – National Amusements SHOWCASE CINEMAS
  • Ypsilanti – National Amusements SHOWCASE CINEMAS ANN ARBOR

MINNESOTA

  • Edina – Cineplex Odeon EDINA 4 <THX>
  • Roseville – General Cinema Corporation HAR-MAR 11 <THX>

MISSISSIPPI

There were no 70mm engagements in Mississippi.

MISSOURI

  • Chesterfield – Wehrenberg CLARKSON 6 <THX>
  • Independence – Mid-America BLUE RIDGE EAST 5
  • St. Louis – Wehrenberg UNION STATION 10 <THX>
  • Shrewsbury – Wehrenberg KENRICK 8 <THX>
  • Springfield – Dickinson CENTURY 21

MONTANA

There were no 70mm engagements in Montana.

NEBRASKA

There were no 70mm engagements in Nebraska.

NEVADA

  • Las Vegas – Syufy CENTURY DESERT 12 <THX>
  • Las Vegas – Syufy CENTURY CINEDOME 6

NEW BRUNSWICK

There were no 70mm engagements in New Brunswick.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

There were no 70mm engagements in New Hampshire.

NEW JERSEY

  • Bridgewater – General Cinema Corporation BRIDGEWATER COMMONS 7 <THX>
  • Paramus – Cineplex Odeon ROUTE 4 TENPLEX
  • Pennsauken – SamEric ERIC 5 PENNSAUKEN
  • Ridgefield Park – Loews RIDGEFIELD PARK 10
  • Sayreville – National Amusements AMBOY MULTIPLEX CINEMAS
  • Secaucus – Loews MEADOW 6
  • Wayne – Loews WAYNE 6
  • West Orange – General Cinema Corporation ESSEX GREEN 3 <THX>

NEW MEXICO

There were no 70mm engagements in New Mexico.

NEW YORK

  • Amherst – General Cinema Corporation UNIVERSITY 8 <THX>
  • Cheektowaga – Hoyts WALDEN GALLERIA 12
  • Commack – National Amusements COMMACK MULTIPLEX CINEMAS
  • Garden City – Loews ROOSEVELT FIELD 8
  • Greece – Jo-Mor STONERIDGE PLAZA 3
  • Hicksville – Town & Country MID-PLAZA CINEMA 6
  • Levittown – Loews NASSAU 6
  • Medford – National Amusements BROOKHAVEN MULTIPLEX CINEMAS <THX>
  • New York (Bronx) – National Amusements WHITESTONE MULTIPLEX CINEMAS
  • New York (Manhattan) – Loews 34TH STREET SHOWPLACE TRIPLEX <SR>
  • New York (Manhattan) – Loews 84TH STREET 6
  • New York (Manhattan) – Loews ASTOR PLAZA <SR>
  • New York (Manhattan) – Loews ORPHEUM TWIN
  • New York (Manhattan) – United Artists GEMINI TWIN
  • New York (Queens) – Cineplex Odeon FRESH MEADOWS 7
  • Pittsford – Loews PITTSFORD TRIPLEX
  • Rockville Centre – Cineplex Odeon FANTASY 5
  • Valley Stream – National Amusements SUNRISE MULTIPLEX CINEMAS
  • Webster – Loews WEBSTER 12

NEWFOUNDLAND

There were no 70mm engagements in Newfoundland.

NORTH CAROLINA

There were no 70mm engagements in North Carolina.

NORTH DAKOTA

There were no 70mm engagements in North Dakota.

Indiana Jones playing in Westwood

NOVA SCOTIA

  • Halifax – Famous Players PARK LANE 8

OHIO

  • Cincinnati – Loews KENWOOD TWIN
  • Columbus – Loews CONTINENT 9
  • Dayton – National Amusements DAYTON MALL 8
  • North Olmsted – National Theatre Corporation GREAT NORTHERN 7 <THX>
  • South Euclid – Loews CEDAR CENTER TWIN
  • Toledo – National Amusements SHOWCASE CINEMAS

OKLAHOMA

  • Oklahoma City – American Multi-Cinema MEMORIAL SQUARE 8

ONTARIO

  • Gloucester – Famous Players GLOUCESTER 5
  • Hamilton – Famous Players TIVOLI
  • London – Famous Players LONDON MEWS 6
  • Mississauga – Famous Players SUSSEX CENTRE 4 <THX>
  • Newmarket – Famous Players GLENWAY 5
  • North York – Famous Players TOWNE & COUNTRYE 2
  • Ottawa – Famous Players ELGIN 2
  • Toronto – Famous Players EGLINTON <THX>
  • Toronto – Famous Players SHERATON CENTRE 2
  • Toronto – Famous Players VICTORIA TERRACE 6

OREGON

  • Portland – Cineplex Odeon 82ND AVENUE 6 <THX>
  • Portland – Luxury Theatres LLOYD 10 <THX>
  • Tigard – Luxury Theatres TIGARD 5 <THX>

PENNSYLVANIA

  • Philadelphia – American Multi-Cinema ORLEANS 8
  • Philadelphia – SamEric SAMERIC 4

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

There were no 70mm engagements in Prince Edward Island.

QUEBEC

  • Dorval – Famous Players DORVAL 4
  • Laval – Famous Players LAVAL 5
  • Montreal – Famous Players IMPERIAL <THX>
  • Sainte-Foy – Famous Players STE FOY 3

RHODE ISLAND

  • Warwick – National Amusements SHOWCASE CINEMAS

SASKATCHEWAN

There were no 70mm engagements in Saskatchewan.

SOUTH CAROLINA

There were no 70mm engagements in South Carolina.

SOUTH DAKOTA

There were no 70mm engagements in South Dakota.

TENNESSEE

  • Memphis – Malco WINCHESTER COURT 8 <THX>
  • Nashville – American Multi-Cinema FOUNTAIN SQUARE 14
  • Nashville – Carmike BELLE MEADE

TEXAS

  • Addison – United Artists PRESTONWOOD CREEK 5 <THX>
  • Austin – Presidio ARBOR 4 <THX>
  • Bedford – United Artists BEDFORD 10 <THX>
  • Dallas – United Artists THE UNITED ARTISTS 8 <THX>
  • Fort Worth – United Artists HULEN 10 <THX>
  • Houston – Loews SAKS CENTER TWIN
  • San Antonio – Santikos GALAXY 14 <THX>
  • San Antonio – Santikos NORTHWEST 14 <THX>
  • Webster – Loews BAY AREA 6

UTAH

  • Salt Lake City – Cineplex Odeon TROLLEY CORNERS 3
  • Salt Lake City – Mann VILLA

VERMONT

There were no 70mm engagements in Vermont.

VIRGINIA

  • Alexandria – National Amusements MOUNT VERNON MULTIPLEX CINEMAS <THX>
  • Baileys Crossroads – Kogod-Burka CINEMA 7
  • Fairfax – United Artists THE MOVIES AT FAIR OAKS
  • McLean – Cineplex Odeon TYSONS CORNER CENTER 4
  • Merrifield – National Amusements LEE HIGHWAY MULTIPLEX CINEMAS <THX>
  • Richmond – Cineplex Odeon RIDGE 7
  • Springfield – General Cinema Corporation SPRINGFIELD MALL 10 <THX>

WASHINGTON

  • Bellevue – Cineplex Odeon JOHN DANZ
  • Lynnwood – Luxury Theatres ALDERWOOD 7 <THX>
  • Seattle – Cineplex Odeon CINERAMA
  • Seattle – Cineplex Odeon OAK TREE 6 <THX>
  • Tacoma – Cineplex Odeon TACOMA MALL TWIN

WEST VIRGINIA

There were no 70mm engagements in West Virginia.

WISCONSIN

  • Greenfield – United Artists SPRING MALL 4
  • Milwaukee – Marcus NORTHTOWN 6

WYOMING

There were no 70mm engagements in Wyoming.

70mm 6-track Dolby logo

[On to Page 2]


[Back to Page 1]

THE INTERVIEW

This segment of the article features a Q&A with author and film historians Scott Higgins, Eric Lichtenfeld, Joseph McBride, and Jonathan Rinzler. The interviews were conducted separately and have been edited into a “roundtable” format.

Scott Higgins is Associate Professor of Film Studies at Wesleyan University, where he teaches several film courses including Cinema of Adventure and Action. His books include Harnessing the Technicolor Rainbow: Color Design in the 1930s, (University of Texas Press, 2007), Arnheim for Film and Media Studies (Routledge, 2010), and the forthcoming Matinee Melodrama.

Eric Lichtenfeld is the author of the book Action Speaks Louder: Violence, Spectacle, and the American Action Movie (Wesleyan, 2007), an authoritative and entertaining study of the action film genre. In addition, he has written about film for Slate and The Hollywood Reporter, and moderated panel discussions for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (including a 2011 screening of Raiders of the Lost Ark) and the American Cinematheque. He has taught film at Loyola Marymount University, UCLA, Wesleyan University, and the Harvard School of Law. Eric has also contributed supplemental material for several DVD and Blu-ray releases, including Speed, Predator and Die Hard.

Joseph McBride is the author of Steven Spielberg: A Biography (Simon & Schuster, 1997; University Press of Mississippi, 2011, second edition; Faber & Faber, 2012, third edition; Chinese translation published in Beijing in 2012). A professor in the Cinema Department at San Francisco State University, McBride has written several other books, including Into the Nightmare: My Search for the Killers of President John F. Kennedy and Officer J.D. Tippit (Hightower Press, 2013), Frank Capra: The Catastrophe of Success (University Press of Mississippi, 2011), Searching for John Ford (University Press of Mississippi, 2011), Whatever Happened to Orson Welles?: A Portrait of an Independent Career (University Press of Kentucky, 2006), and Writing in Pictures: Screenwriting Made (Mostly) Painless (Vintage, 2012). He was a co-producer on the documentary Obsessed with Vertigo: New Life for Hitchcock’s Masterpiece and a co-writer of the screenplay for Rock ‘n’ Roll High School (1979).

Jonathan Rinzler is the executive editor of LucasBooks, the publishing division of Lucasfilm Ltd., and the author (with Laurent Bouzereau) of The Complete Making of Indiana Jones: The Definitive Story Behind All Four Films (Ballantine/Del Rey, 2008). He has also written several Star Wars and Lucasfilm-themed books, including The Making of Star Wars (Ballantine/Del Rey, 2007), The Making of The Empire Strikes Back (Ballantine/Del Rey, 2010), The Making of Return of the Jedi (Ballantine/Del Rey, 2013), The Sounds of Star Wars (Chronicle, 2010), and Star Wars: The Blueprints (47North, 2013).

L to R: Scott Higgins, Eric Lichtenfeld, Joseph McBride & Jonathan Rinzler

L to R (above): Scott Higgins, Eric Lichtenfeld, Joseph McBride & Jonathan Rinzler

 

Michael Coate (The Digital Bits): Indiana Jones was the most successful 1980s movie franchise? Why?

Scott Higgins: Partly, the answer is timing. All three Jones films were released in the 80s vs. only two of the Star Wars franchise.

Eric Lichtenfeld: They weren’t just great movies; they were also great experiences. And each was a great experience in its own way—more or less. And the movie—especially the first and third—lend themselves to both repeat viewings and to all audiences, so you could go back and back with different groups and kinds of the people in your life.

Joseph McBride: It brought back old entertainment values tried and tested in the thirties and earlier—serials and B movies. But on bigger budgets and with better actors. It came at a time when movies were being dumbed down and focused on juvenilia in synch with the times (the Reagan era) and when Hollywood was turning its back on personal filmmaking in favor of self-conscious genre homages (i.e., rip-offs).

Jonathan Rinzler: You had the best of the best on the crew and at ILM—and then you had two geniuses at the top in Lucas and Spielberg. And sometimes an actor gets the role they were born to play, and that seems to me to be true for Harrison Ford as Indiana Jones.

Coate: How are the Indiana Jones movies significant within the action-adventure genre?

Higgins: It is interesting that you should specify “action-adventure” rather than “action” as the genre in question. I think our conception of “action-adventure” as a distinct part of the action film tradition comes largely from the Indiana Jones films. Part of what makes them “adventure” is tone—they are throwbacks to Fairbank’s Thief of Bagdad and Flynn’s Adventures of Robin Hood in their broadly drawn subsidiary characters, gleefully obvious comedy, and basic sincerity. These films are rollicking, in a way that adult-oriented action films were not. For better or worse, they created a model for the “family actioner”—movies pitched broadly enough to play cross-generationally, but still crafted around physical problem solving and violent encounters. I guess I’m describing the basic tent pole film—and it has served the industry well (Independence Day, Avengers) and disappointed terribly (Wild, Wild West, anyone?). The Indiana Jones films didn’t invent this approach, but they carried it off with originality and set a certain standard.

The Indiana Jones films are also important as an American answer to Bond, which is probably the century’s most important action franchise. It is clear that Spielberg and Lucas were emulating Bond, replacing 007’s romantic and exotic Britishness with an equally romantic and exotic nostalgia for America during the good war. Jones substantially cleaned up Bond’s sexuality, but kept his humor and physical cleverness.

If you think of the landmarks of the contemporary action film, Raiders definitely belongs among the fantasy-oriented trend: Star Wars, Superman, Terminator, The Matrix, etc.

Scene from Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade

Lichtenfeld: Strangely, I’ve always seen them as something apart from the action-adventure genre. At the time the first three were released, they didn’t really look like the rest of the genre. After all, this was still the era of the R-rated action movie that generally didn’t have the scope or craftsmanship of the Indiana Jones movies.

McBride: Steven Spielberg has a genuine kinetic gift for cinematic action. With Raiders, he was moving fast and working economically to overcome the reputation for overindulgence he had acquired with the bloated 1941, so Raiders benefits from that zip and efficiency and a certain amount of visual and verbal wit (the latter thanks to Lawrence Kasdan’s screenplay). But Raiders is marred by its racist and neocolonialist viewpoint. It was the perfect film to start off the Reagan era in Hollywood studio filmmaking, a miserable period. Spielberg faltered even more badly, in my view, with Temple of Doom, which is so shrill, gross, and racist that it is a deeply embarrassing work. Ironically, that very grossness has made it something of a cult favorite among the undiscriminating. I like the third film in the series, Last Crusade, because instead of Third World villains, it has villains we can all despise (Nazis) and has a visual spaciousness and energy and wit that seems more relaxed than the previous entries. And it has that fascinatingly complex father-son tension between Indy and his Dad (Sean Connery), which goes to the heart of Spielberg’s thematics. I even sort of like Crystal Skull, with all its absurdity, because I believe Spielberg approached it as a lark, a framework for spoofing his earlier work systematically, genre by genre. I even like the “nuking the fridge” scene and especially the self-satire of immolating the iconic Spielberg suburban home.

Rinzler: With the Indy films, Spielberg and Lucas created the film-as-Disneyland-ride. Of course the films have story and character—but at a certain point, usually about a third of the way through, Indy films become like rides—just nonstop fun and adventure and thrills.

Coate: How do the Indiana Jones movies pay homage to and improve upon the serials that inspired them?

Higgins: The Jones films draw iconography and plot devices from serials and studio-era B adventures more generally. Lucas and Spielberg wanted to recapture the thrills they remembered experiencing in local revival houses when they were growing up, and so these films are steeped in nostalgia for an older cinematic language. Like serials of the 30s-50s, the Indiana Jones

          

Fortune & Glory: Remembering “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” on its 30th Anniversary   

Cache   

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom

“This picture is not called The Temple of Roses; it is called The Temple of Doom. The warning is clearly marked on the box.” — Steven Spielberg

The Digital Bits is pleased to present this retrospective commemorating the 30th anniversary of the release of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, the follow-up to the incredibly popular Raiders of the Lost Ark.

The Bits celebrates the occasion with this retrospective column. It features some quotes from movie critics, some trivia on the film, an interview segment (featuring film historians Scott Higgins and Eric Lichtenfeld), a list of the movie’s premium-format (70mm) presentations, and a compilation of box-office data that places the movie’s performance in context. [Read on here…]

 

 

INDIANA JONES NUMBER$ AT A GLANCE

  • 1 = Number of weeks nation’s top-grossing movie
  • 2 = Rank among top-grossing movies of 1984 (calendar year)
  • 3 = Rank among top-grossing movies of 1984 (legacy)
  • 7 = Rank on all-time list of top-grossing movies at close of original run
  • 86 = Rank on current list of all-time top-grossing movies (domestic, adjusted for inflation)
  • 25 = Number of days movie took to gross $100 million
  • 28 = Number of months between theatrical release and home-video release
  • 35.3 = Percentage of second-week drop-off in box-office gross
  • 180 = Rank on current list of all-time top-grossing movies (domestic)
  • 243 = Number of 70mm prints shown in North America*
  • 266 = Rank on current list of all-time top-grossing movies (worldwide)
  • 1,687 = Number of theaters showing the movie during opening-weekend
  • $4.7 million = Opening-day box-office gross
  • $9.3 million = Highest single-day gross (May 27)*
  • $25.3 million = Opening weekend box-office gross (3-day, May 25-27)*
  • $28.2 million = Production cost
  • $33.9 million = Opening weekend box-office gross (4-day holiday, May 25-28)*
  • $42.3 million = Opening week box-office gross (6-day, May 23-28)*
  • $45.7 million = Opening week box-office gross (7-day, May 23-29)*
  • $64.3 million = Production cost (adjusted for inflation)
  • $102.0 million = International box-office rental (% of gross exhibitors paid to distributor)
  • $109.0 million = Domestic box-office rental
  • $153.2 million = International box-office gross
  • $179.9 million = Domestic box-office gross
  • $211.0 million = Worldwide box-office rental
  • $333.1 million = Worldwide box-office gross
  • $426.1 million = Domestic box-office gross (adjusted for inflation)
  • $760.1 million = Worldwide box-office gross (adjusted for inflation)

*Established new industry record

George Lucas and Steven Spielberg

 

A SAMPLING OF MOVIE REVIEWER QUOTES

“The monster hit factory of George Lucas and Steven Spielberg has finally produced a monster: an unpleasant, slapdash, chaotic and finally yawn-inducing follow-up to Raiders of the Lost Ark…and for the first time Lucas/Spielberg cross over the line between fantasy violence and real pain. They’ve also come up with a heroine who’s such a charmless bimbo that you have mixed feelings every time she’s in jeopardy.” — John Hartl, The Seattle Times

“This movie is one of the most relentlessly nonstop action pictures ever made, with a virtuoso series of climactic sequences that must last an hour and never stop for a second. It’s a roller-coaster ride, a visual extravaganza, a technical triumph, and a whole lot of fun.” — Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

“Yech! I don’t care if this film makes $100 million. Since when does big box office equate with intelligence, quality, culture or even a smidgen of social conscience?” — Gary Franklin, KCBS-TV, Los Angeles

“If at all possible, see Doom in a movie house showing it in 70mm and Dolby Stereo. Why settle for half the effect?” — Rick Lyman, Philadelphia Inquirer

“This time the 1930s archaeologist/adventurer has a weaker story and wimpier heroine.” — Leonard Maltin, Entertainment Tonight

“Though it looks as if it had cost a fortune, Indiana Jones doesn’t go anywhere, possibly because it is composed entirely of a succession of climaxes. It could end at any point with nothing essential being lost. Watching it is like spending a day at an amusement park, which is probably what Mr. Spielberg and his associates intended. It moves tirelessly from one ride or attraction to the next, only occasionally taking a minute out for a hot dog, and then going right on to the next unspeakable experience.” — Vincent Canby, The New York Times

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom has to be the greatest action movie ever filmed. No other movie ever has offered such a generous feast of breathtaking thrills, rough-and-tumble spills, colorful-and-funny frills and heart-grabbing chills. Yes, Spielberg and Lucas have done it again.” — Jack Garner, (Rochester) Democrat and Chronicle

“One of the greatest assets Spielberg and Lucas have had was their ability to go straight to the movie myths of their childhoods and, in reworking them, enrich a new generation of moviegoers. This time it feels as though they could never erase these movies from their memories, and now no one else will be able to either.” — Sheila Benson, Los Angeles Times

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom has a lot of laughs, thrills, noise, detail, darkness and sheer entertainment packed into it. It’s a tribute to hokiness through and through. For being exactly what you’d expect, I give it four little men leaping out of their chairs (though two of them aren’t clapping, they’re gagging on monkey brains). — Peter Stack, San Francisco Chronicle

“There’s so much movie in this movie—that’s the basic reason that Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom is so appealing. Its main show, a five-minute chase sequence in mining cars between Indiana and Short Round and Willie in one car and the henchmen of the evil child-abuser Mola Ram in another. This beautifully directed and edited chase is even more exhilarating than one’s childhood memory of the roller-coaster sequence in This Is Cinerama (1952). And it’s almost as exciting as a real trip on Walt Disney World’s Space Mountain. Credit Spielberg and producer Lucas’ special effects team at Industrial Light & Magic for this entry on anyone’s list of filmdom’s greatest chases.” — Gene Siskel, Chicago Tribune

 

TRIVIA + PRODUCTION & EXHIBITION INFORMATION

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (Advance B)On May 16, 1984, in conjunction with the release of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Steven Spielberg and George Lucas placed their hand and foot prints in the cement courtyard of Mann’s Chinese Theater in Los Angeles.

During an era where six months was the average amount of time between theatrical release and home-video release, Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom had a theatrical-to-video “window” of 28 months by arriving on home-video formats in September 1986.

The first network television broadcast was on ABC on October 1, 1989. Its first letterboxed release (on LaserDisc) was in 1992. Its first DVD release was in 2003. Its first Blu-ray release was in 2012.

The THX Sound System “Broadway” snipe was introduced with Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom is set one year prior to the events in Raiders of the Lost Ark.

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom was screened on the eve of its release as part of the Seattle Film Festival.

The names of the film’s three principal characters were inspired by the names of the filmmakers’ pet dogs: Indiana (George Lucas), Willie (Steven Spielberg), Short Round (Willard Huyck & Gloria Katz).

The movie’s original titles were Indy II and Indiana Jones and the Temple of Death.

The miniature stop-motion-animation footage for the mine-car chase sequence was filmed using a consumer Nikon SLR 35mm camera.

The name of the bar in the opening Shanghai sequence was Club Obi-Wan, an inside joke and reference to one of the popular characters from Star Wars.

The opening of Indiana Jones in the United Kingdom was preceded by a Royal European premiere. The charity event was held on June 11, 1984, and attended by Prince Charles and Princess Diana. Attending on behalf of the movie were Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, Kate Capshaw and Ke Huy Quan.

As with Raiders, where he played the German Flying Wing pilot, producer Frank Marshall had a small role in the movie, this time appearing as a sailor riding a rickshaw during the Shanghai chase scene.

Members of the production crew, including Spielberg and Lucas, played missionaries during the airport scene. Also look for Dan Aykroyd in same scene.

Reaction to the violence and overall intensity featured in the movie (and in the Spielberg-produced Gremlins released two weeks later) prompted the formation of the PG-13 rating.

The movie’s 70-millimeter print order (243) was the largest ever for a North American release. It was reported that the 70mm presentations, which represented 13% of the movie’s bookings, accounted for 30% of the box-office gross during the movie’s first week of release.

Awards won included Visual Effects (Academy Awards) and Special Visual Effects (BAFTA).

 

THE 70MM ENGAGEMENTS

Temple of Doom newspaper adThe following is a list of the 70mm Six-Track Dolby Stereo premium-format presentations of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom during the initial weeks of its first-run theatrical release in the United States and Canada. These were, arguably, the best theaters in which to experience the movie. Any move-over, sub-run and international bookings have not been included. As well, the second wave of THX certifications were made in conjunction with this release and are noted in parenthesis where applicable.

** shown on two screens

*** shown on three screens

ALABAMA

There were no 70mm first-run engagements in Alabama.

ALASKA

There were no 70mm first-run engagements in Alaska.

ALBERTA

  • Calgary – Famous Players PALACE
  • Edmonton – Famous Players PARAMOUNT
  • Edmonton – Famous Players WESTMALL 5

ARIZONA

  • Phoenix – Mann CHRIS-TOWN 5 (THX)
  • Phoenix – Plitt CINE CAPRI
  • Tucson – American Multi-Cinema CAMPBELL PLAZA 3
  • Tucson – Mann BUENA VISTA TWIN

ARKANSAS

  • Little Rock – United Artists CINEMA 150

BRITISH COLUMBIA

  • Burnaby – Famous Players LOUGHEED MALL 3
  • Vancouver – Famous Players STANLEY
  • Victoria – Famous Players CORONET

CALIFORNIA

  • Berkeley – Cinerama BERKELEY
  • Clovis – Festival Enterprises REGENCY CINEMAS
  • Corte Madera – Marin CINEMA
  • Costa Mesa – Edwards SOUTH COAST PLAZA TRIPLEX
  • Fremont – Syufy CINEDOME 7 EAST**
  • Fresno – Festival Enterprises FESTIVAL CINEMAS
  • Hayward – Festival Enterprises FESTIVAL CINEMAS
  • La Mesa – Pacific CINEMA GROSSMONT
  • La Mirada – Pacific LA MIRADA 6
  • Laguna Hills – Edwards/Sanborn LAGUNA HILLS MALL TRIPLEX
  • Lakewood – Pacific LAKEWOOD CENTER
  • Long Beach – United Artists MOVIES 6
  • Los Angeles (Hollywood) – Mann CHINESE TRIPLEX*** (THX)
  • Los Angeles (Northridge) – Pacific NORTHRIDGE 6
  • Los Angeles (Sherman Oaks) – Mann LA REINA
  • Los Angeles (Westwood Village) – Mann NATIONAL (THX)
  • Los Angeles (Woodland Hills) – Pacific TOPANGA 1 & 2
  • Modesto – Festival Enterprises FESTIVAL CINEMAS**
  • Monrovia – Mann HUNTINGTON OAKS 6**
  • Montclair – Sterling Recreation Organization MONTCLAIR TRIPLEX
  • Newport Beach – Edwards NEWPORT 1 & 2
  • Orange – Syufy CINEDOME 6**
  • Palm Desert – Metropolitan TOWN CENTER 7
  • Palm Springs – Metropolitan CAMELOT TRIPLEX
  • Pleasant Hill – Syufy CENTURY 5
  • Riverside – Sanborn CANYON CREST 9**
  • Sacramento – Syufy CENTURY 6***
  • San Diego – Mann LOMA
  • San Diego – Pacific LA JOLLA VILLAGE 4
  • San Francisco – Blumenfeld REGENCY I
  • San Francisco – Blumenfeld REGENCY II
  • San Jose – Syufy CENTURY 22 A-B-C***
  • Santa Barbara – Metropolitan ARLINGTON
  • Stockton – Festival Enterprises REGENCY CINEMAS**
  • Temple City – Edwards TEMPLE 4
  • Thousand Oaks – United Artists MOVIES 5

COLORADO

  • Colorado Springs – Commonwealth CINEMA 70 TRIPLEX
  • Colorado Springs – Commonwealth MALL OF THE BLUFFS TWIN
  • Denver – Mann CENTURY 21 (THX)
  • Littleton – American Multi-Cinema SOUTHBRIDGE PLAZA 8

CONNECTICUT

  • East Hartford – Redstone SHOWCASE CINEMAS
  • Orange – Redstone SHOWCASE CINEMAS
  • Stamford – Trans-Lux RIDGEWAY

DELAWARE

There were no 70mm first-run engagements in Delaware.

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

  • Washington – Kogod-Burka CINEMA

FLORIDA

  • North Miami Beach – Loews 167TH STREET TWIN
  • Orlando – Plitt PLAZA 1-2

GEORGIA

  • Atlanta – Georgia Theatre Company LENOX SQUARE 6
  • Atlanta – COLUMBIA
  • Augusta – Georgia Theatre Company NATIONAL HILLS
  • North Atlanta – Storey 12 OAKS TWIN
  • Savannah – Litchfield TARA
  • Tucker – American Multi-Cinema NORTHLAKE FESTIVAL 8**

HAWAII

  • Honolulu – Consolidated CINERAMA

IDAHO

There were no 70mm first-run engagements in Idaho.

ILLINOIS

  • Belleville – Bloomer Amusement Company CINEMA
  • Calumet City – Plitt RIVER OAKS 1-2-3-4-5-6
  • Chicago – Plitt ESQUIRE
  • Chicago – Plitt NORTOWN 1-2-3
  • Chicago – Plitt STATE-LAKE
  • Evergreen Park – Marks & Rosenfield EVERGREEN 4
  • Hillside – Marks & Rosenfield HILLSIDE SQUARE 4
  • Lombard – General Cinema Corporation YORKTOWN CINEMA I-II-III (THX)
  • Mount Prospect – General Cinema Corporation RANDHURST CINEMA I & II
  • Norridge – Marks & Rosenfield NORRIDGE 4
  • Orland Park – Plitt ORLAND SQUARE 1-2-3-4
  • Peoria – Kerasotes BEVERLY
  • Schaumburg – Plitt WOODFIELD 1-2-3-4
  • Skokie – Marks & Rosenfield OLD ORCHARD 4
  • Springfield – Kerasotes TOWN & COUNTRY

INDIANA

  • Fort Wayne – Mallers-Spirou HOLIDAY I & II

IOWA

  • Cedar Rapids – Dubinsky PLAZA
  • Des Moines – Dubinsky RIVER HILLS
  • Dubuque – Dubuque CINEMA CENTER

KANSAS

  • Overland Park – Dickinson GLENWOOD I & II
  • Wichita – Commonwealth TWIN LAKES
  • Wichita – Dickinson MALL

KENTUCKY

  • Erlanger – Redstone SHOWCASE CINEMAS
  • Lexington – Mid States SOUTHPARK 6
  • Louisville – Redstone SHOWCASE CINEMAS

LOUISIANA

  • Baton Rouge – General Cinema Corporation CORTANA MALL CINEMA I-II-III
  • Marrero – Gulf States BELLE PROMENADE 6
  • New Orleans – Mann ROBERT E. LEE

MAINE

There were no 70mm first-run engagements in Maine.

MANITOBA

  • Winnipeg – Famous Players METROPOLITAN

MARYLAND

  • Baltimore – Durkee SENATOR
  • Woodlawn – General Cinema Corporation SECURITY MALL CINEMA I-II-III-IV

MASSACHUSETTS

  • Boston – Sack CINEMA 57 TWIN
  • Brookline – Redstone CIRCLE CINEMAS
  • Dedham – Redstone SHOWCASE CINEMAS
  • Revere – Redstone SHOWCASE CINEMAS
  • Seekonk – Redstone SHOWCASE CINEMAS**
  • Worcester – Redstone SHOWCASE CINEMAS

MICHIGAN

  • Ann Arbor – United Artists FOX VILLAGE 4
  • Bloomfield Hills – Redstone SHOWCASE CINEMAS
  • Dearborn – United Artists THE MOVIES AT FAIRLANE
  • Flint – Butterfield FLINT
  • Harper Woods – Suburban Detroit EASTLAND TWIN
  • Lansing – United Artists SPARTAN TRIPLEX
  • Southfield – Suburban Detroit NORTHLAND TWIN
  • Sterling Heights – Redstone SHOWCASE CINEMAS

MINNESOTA

  • Bloomington – General Cinema Corporation SOUTHTOWN CINEMA I & II
  • Minneapolis – Plitt SKYWAY 5
  • Minnetonka – Plitt RIDGE SQUARE 1-2-3
  • Roseville – General Cinema Corporation HAR-MAR CINEMA XI (THX)
  • West St. Paul – Engler SIGNAL HILLS 4

MISSISSIPPI

There were no 70mm first-run engagements in Mississippi.

MISSOURI

  • Chesterfield – Wehrenberg CLARKSON 6
  • Creve Coeur – Wehrenberg CREVE COEUR
  • Independence – Mid-America BLUE RIDGE EAST 5
  • Kansas City – Commonwealth BANNISTER SQUARE MALL 5
  • Springfield – Dickinson CENTURY 21

MONTANA

There were no 70mm first-run engagements in Montana.

NEBRASKA

  • Omaha – American Multi-Cinema WESTROADS 6
  • Omaha – Douglas CINEMA CENTER
  • Omaha – Douglas Q CINEMA 6

NEVADA

  • Las Vegas – Syufy CINEDOME 6
  • Reno – Syufy CENTURY 6

NEW BRUNSWICK

There were no 70mm first-run engagements in New Brunswick.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

There were no 70mm first-run engagements in New Hampshire.

NEW JERSEY

  • Edison – General Cinema Corporation MENLO PARK CINEMA I & II
  • Paramus – RKO Century ROUTE 4 TENPLEX
  • Pennsauken – SamEric ERIC 5 PENNSAUKEN
  • Sayreville – Redstone AMBOY MULTIPLEX CINEMAS
  • Secaucus – Loews MEADOW SIX
  • Wayne – Loews WAYNE SIX
  • West Orange – General Cinema Corporation ESSEX GREEN CINEMA I-II-III (THX)

NEW MEXICO

  • Albuquerque – Commonwealth CINEMA EAST TWIN
  • Albuquerque – General Cinema Corporation LOUISIANA BLVD. CINEMA I-II-III

NEW YORK

  • Cheektowaga – American Multi-Cinema HOLIDAY 6
  • Commack – Redstone COMMACK MULTIPLEX CINEMAS
  • Garden City – RKO Century ROOSEVELT FIELD TRIPLEX
  • Greece – Jo-Mor STONERIDGE PLAZA TWIN
  • Levittown – Loews NASSAU SIX
  • New York (Bronx) – Redstone WHITESTONE MULTIPLEX CINEMAS
  • New York (Manhattan) – Loews 34TH STREET SHOWPLACE
  • New York (Manhattan) – Loews ASTOR PLAZA
  • New York (Manhattan) – Loews ORPHEUM
  • Pittsford – Loews PITTSFORD TRIPLEX
  • Schenectady – CinemaNational MOHAWK MALL 3
  • Valley Stream – Redstone SUNRISE MULTIPLEX CINEMAS
  • West Webster – Loews WEBSTER 8

NEWFOUNDLAND

There were no 70mm first-run engagements in Newfoundland.

NORTH CAROLINA

  • Charlotte – Plitt PARK TERRACE 1-2-3
  • Raleigh – Plitt CARDINAL 1-2

NORTH DAKOTA

There were no 70mm first-run engagements in North Dakota.

NOVA SCOTIA

  • Halifax – Famous Players SCOTIA SQUARE

OHIO

  • Beavercreek – Mid States BEAVER VALLEY 6
  • Columbus – Mid States CONTINENT 7
  • Dayton – Chakeres DAYTON MALL 8
  • Springdale – Redstone SHOWCASE CINEMAS
  • Summerside – Redstone SHOWCASE CINEMAS EASTGATE
  • Trotwood – Mid States SALEM MALL 4
  • Whitehall – Chakeres CINEMA EAST

OKLAHOMA

  • Tulsa – United Artists BOMAN TWIN

ONTARIO

  • Hamilton – Famous Players TIVOLI
  • London – Famous Players PARK
  • Newmarket – Famous Players GLENWAY 5
  • Ottawa – Famous Players ELGIN
  • Richmond Hill – Famous Players TOWN & COUNTRYE
  • Toronto – Famous Players CEDARBRAE 6
  • Toronto – Famous Players CUMBERLAND 4 “LA RESERVE”
  • Toronto – Famous Players RUNNYMEDE 1 & 2
  • Toronto – Famous Players UNIVERSITY

OREGON

  • Beaverton – Luxury Theatres WESTGATE TRIPLEX
  • Eugene – Moyer WEST 11TH TRIPLEX
  • Portland – Moyer ROSE MOYER 6

PENNSYLVANIA

  • Monroeville – Redstone SHOWCASE CINEMAS EAST
  • Philadelphia – SamEric SAMERIC 3***
  • Robinson – Redstone SHOWCASE CINEMAS WEST

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

There were no 70mm first-run engagements in Prince Edward Island.

QUEBEC

  • Laval – United LAVAL 4
  • Montreal – United IMPERIAL
  • Quebec City – United CANADIEN

RHODE ISLAND

  • Warwick – Redstone SHOWCASE CINEMAS**

SASKATCHEWAN

There were no 70mm first-run engagements in Saskatchewan.

SOUTH CAROLINA

  • Greenville – Martin ASTRO TWIN

SOUTH DAKOTA

There were no 70mm first-run engagements in South Dakota.

TENNESSEE

  • Antioch – Martin BELLE FORGE 6
  • Goodletsville – Martin RIVERGATE 6
  • Knoxville – Simpson CAPRI 4
  • Nashville – Martin BELLE MEADE

TEXAS

  • Addison – United Artists PRESTONWOOD CREEK 5** (THX)
  • Amarillo – United Artists CINEMA 6 (THX)
  • Arlington – Loews LINCOLN SQUARE 6
  • Austin – Mann FOX TRIPLEX
  • Beaumont – United Artists PHELAN 6 (THX)
  • Carrollton – General Cinema Corporation FURNEAUX CREEK CINEMA VII
  • Dallas – General Cinema Corporation CARUTH PLAZA CINEMA I & II
  • Dallas – United Artists SKILLMAN 6 (THX)
  • Dallas – United Artists SOUTH 8 (THX)
  • Dallas – United Artists WALNUT HILL 6 (THX)
  • Fort Worth – United Artists HULEN 6 (THX)
  • Highland Park – Beirsdorf & Brooks VILLAGE 3
  • Houston – American Multi-Cinema WESTCHASE 5
  • Houston – Loews SOUTHPOINT 5
  • Houston – Plitt CINEMA 5
  • Houston – Plitt WEST OAKS 7
  • Hurst – United Artists CINEMA 6 (THX)
  • Mesquite – United Artists TOWN EAST 6 (THX)
  • San Antonio – Santikos GALAXY 10
  • San Antonio – Santikos NORTHWEST 10
  • White Settlement – United Artists LAS VEGAS TRAIL 8 (THX)

UTAH

  • Salt Lake City – Mann VILLA
  • Salt Lake City – Plitt CENTRE
  • South Ogden – Plitt WILSHIRE 1-2-3

VERMONT

There were no 70mm first-run engagements in Vermont.

VIRGINIA

  • Baileys Crossroads – Kogod-Burka CINEMA 7
  • Fairfax – United Artists THE MOVIES AT FAIR OAKS
  • McLean – Neighborhood TYSONS CORNER 4
  • Richmond – Litchfield MIDLOTHIAN 6
  • Richmond – Neighborhood RIDGE 4
  • Springfield – General Cinema Corporation SPRINGFIELD MALL CINEMA VI (THX)

WASHINGTON

  • Bellevue – Sterling Recreation Organization JOHN DANZ
  • Seattle – Sterling Recreation Organization NORTHGATE
  • Seattle – Sterling Recreation Organization UPTOWN
  • Spokane – Sterling Recreation Organization STATE
  • Spokane Valley – Luxury Theatres EAST SPRAGUE 6
  • Tacoma – Sterling Recreation Organization TACOMA MALL TWIN
  • Tukwila – Sterling Recreation Organization SOUTHCENTER
  • Union Gap – Yakima MERCY 6

WEST VIRGINIA

There were no 70mm first-run engagements in West Virginia.

WISCONSIN

  • Brookfield – Marcus BROOKFIELD SQUARE 2
  • Fox Point – Capitol BROWN PORT
  • Greenfield – Capitol SPRING MALL 3
  • Madison – Marcus EASTGATE 4
  • Milwaukee – Capitol LOOMIS ROAD 4
  • Milwaukee – Marcus NORTHTOWN 4

WYOMING

There were no 70mm first-run engagements in Wyoming.

[On to Page 2]


[Back to Page 1]

THE INTERVIEW

Scott Higgins is Associate Professor of Film Studies at Wesleyan University, where he teaches a course on The Action Film.  He wrote a book about the history of Technicolor called Harnessing the Technicolor Rainbow: Color Design in the 1930s, edited a book about the work of early film theorist Rudolf Arnheim (Arnheim for Film and Media Studies), and is finishing a book on the sound-era serial entitled Matinee Melodrama.

Eric Lichtenfeld is the author of the book Action Speaks Louder: Violence, Spectacle, and the American Action Movie, an authoritative and entertaining study of the action film genre. In addition, he has written about film, interviewed filmmakers, and moderated panel discussions for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (including a 2011 screening of Raiders of the Lost Ark), the American Cinematheque, Slate, The Hollywood Reporter, and more. He has taught film to students at Loyola Marymount University, UCLA, Wesleyan University, and the Harvard School of Law. He is also a communications and film industry professional whose specialties include motion picture advertising, speechwriting, and others. Eric has also contributed supplemental material for several DVD and Blu-ray releases, including Speed, Predator, and Die Hard.

Temple of Doom logo

Michael Coate (The Digital Bits):  Indiana Jones was the most successful 1980s movie series. Why?

Scott Higgins:  Partly, the answer is timing.  All three Jones films were released in the 80s vs. only two of the Star Wars franchise.

Eric Lichtenfeld:  They weren’t just great movies; they were also great experiences.  And each was a great experience in its own way—more or less.  And the movie—especially the first and third—lend themselves to both repeat viewings and to all audiences, so you could go back and back with different groups and kinds of the people in your life.

Coate:  In what way is Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom worthy of celebration on its 30th anniversary?

Higgins:  The film is a cultural touchstone for a generation, and so it has every right to an anniversary celebration.  It is not as innovative or important as Raiders, which set the iconography in place and launched a cycle of lesser films and television shows, but Doom was hugely popular and well marketed – it left a big footprint.

I think that when people return to Doom they will be surprised by how 80s it seems.  Raiders made the leap to “timeless icon” pretty quickly.  As with Star Wars, it can be difficult to get critical distance from a film like Raiders.  Doom isn’t burdened by being a “classic.”  Things like the Dan Aykroyd cameo, Kate Capshaw’s haircut, and the “racy” sex jokes are abysmal in a very historically specific way.

Lichtenfeld:  I’d like to think that the 30th anniversary of Temple of Doom might lead viewers to revisit and reevaluate the movie.  For the most part, it has a reputation it doesn’t deserve and it doesn’t have the reputation that it should.  It’s not the masterpiece that Raiders is, but it’s a brave movie.  And visually, it’s practically a feast.  The cinematography is some of my favorite of all time—not just of the series.

Coate:  How are the Indiana Jones movies significant within the action-adventure genre?

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (Version 3)Higgins:  It is interesting that you should specify, “action-adventure” rather than “action” as the genre in question.  I think our conception of “action-adventure” as a distinct part of the action film tradition comes largely from the Indiana Jones films.  Part of what makes them “adventure” is tone – they are throwbacks to Fairbank’s Thief of Bagdad and Flynn’s Adventures of Robin Hood in their broadly drawn subsidiary characters, gleefully obvious comedy, and basic sincerity.  These films are rollicking, in a way that adult-oriented action films were not.  For better or worse, they created a model for the “family actioner” – movies pitched broadly enough to play cross-generationally, but still crafted around physical problem solving and violent encounters. I guess I’m describing the basic tent pole film – and it has served the industry well (ID4, Avengers) and disappointed terribly (Wild, Wild West, anyone?). The Indiana Jones films didn’t invent this approach, but they carried it off with originality and set a certain standard.

The Indiana Jones films are also important as an American answer to Bond, which is probably the century’s most important action franchise. It is clear that Spielberg and Lucas were emulating Bond, replacing 007’s romantic and exotic Britishness with an equally romantic and exotic nostalgia for America during the good war. Jones substantially cleaned up Bond’s sexuality, but kept his humor and physical cleverness.

If you think of the landmarks of the contemporary action film, Raiders definitely belongs among the fantasy-oriented trend: Star Wars, Superman, Terminator, The Matrix, etc.

Lichtenfeld:  Strangely, I’ve always seen them as something apart from the action-adventure genre.  At the time the first three were released, they didn’t really look like the rest of the genre.  After all, this was still the era of the R-rated action movie that generally didn’t have the scope or craftsmanship of the Indiana Jones movies.

Coate: How do the Indiana Jones movies pay homage to and improve upon the serials that inspired them?

Higgins:  The Jones films draw iconography and plot devices from serials and studio-era B adventures more generally.  Lucas and Spielberg wanted to recapture the thrills they remembered experiencing in local revival houses when they were growing up, and so these films are steeped in nostalgia for an older cinematic language.  Like serials of the 30s-50s, the Indiana Jones films have a sort of crackpot optimism set alongside stunning depictions of depravity.  Like serials, the Indiana Jones films can fail to make sense on a very basic level.  Like serials, they cover plot holes by simply speeding forward through stunts and chases.

Unlike the serials, the Jones films tend to be unified, coherent, and centered on psychologized characters.  In other words, these are feature films, and they are far more tightly plotted than, say, Captain Midnight.  Also, unlike most serials, Indiana Jones has the benefit of huge budgets.  Spielberg can realize warhorse serial set pieces, like the rope bridge, the crushing room, the abandoned airplane, the ritual sacrifice, or even the horse/car chase and booby-trapped temple at a much, much higher level than the B serials.  What those original movies lacked in budget they made up for in cockeyed ingenuity.   In serials, Spielberg and Lucas found a storehouse of ideas that they could raid and renew.  Incidentally, the Bond franchise first inherited and embellished the serial’s territory, so Indiana Jones is re-appropriating it to American shores.

I think the Indiana Jones films are most successful in emulating the serial’s relentless rhythm of action.  Raiders hits a serial-like tempo of stunt-per-minute toward the end of its second act (from the snake-tomb through the truck chase). In Doom, it feels like the filmmakers realized this was their most successful sequence, and so extended that kind of pacing across the entire second half of the film (everything that occurs underground through the climax).  That decision made the second half of Doom hard to beat in terms of action and absurd spectacle.  Alas, that left too much time in the first half devoted to clumsy exposition and Kate Capshaw.

Lichtenfeld:  They’re structured like serials and they capture the spirit of serials, but they have real production value and, even more, craftsmanship.  It’s hard to get pulpier than with Temple of Doom and yet John Williams’s score is so rich and complex, it’s practically operatic.

It’s as if these are the movies the serials wanted to be, and in that sense, they’re the fulfillment of—I was going to say “a potential” or “a promise,” but that’s not quite it, because the serials could never really hope to achieve that in their lifetime.  People use movies to help them dream of being something else.  If movies could dream of being something else, than the serials dreamed of being the Indiana Jones series!

Coate:  Can you recall your reaction to the first time you saw Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom?

Higgins:  Disappointment.  I didn’t see it twice.  In comparison, seeing Raiders for the first time was pure awesome.  That film has this momentum that feels like it can go anywhere, and it had just enough horror and sex to keep my 13 year-old self on the edge of my seat.  It stuck around all summer, so we kept going back, following it through the runs.

Coate:  Was the controversy over Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom’s violence that led to the formation of the PG-13 MPAA rating justified?

Harrison Ford as Indiana JonesHiggins:  Yep.  Thing is, Doom’s violence comes straight from the world of serials, but mixed with a Hammer Horror color design and graphic sensibility.  Serials could be terribly violent, and they were full of graphically violent ideas if not always images.  Dumping people into fire-pits was no big thing.  But serials were not generally submitted to the Hays Office for approval, because they weren’t booked into the major’s theaters.  They got away with a lot during the 30s and 40s.  Hammer slipped through between the end of the Hays Code and the ratings system.  It is fitting that, in trying to tap this tradition of intense violence for kiddies, Spielberg raised the MPAA’s hackles.  Serials benefitted from staying under the radar.

Lichtenfeld:  Personally, I don’t think the violence was as problematic as the nightmarish imagery.  (Of course, you could argue that extracting a still-beating human heart qualifies as both!)  Either way, I think the controversy was justified, as was the creation of the PG-13 rating.

The new rating was Hollywood at its most inspired: socially responsible and good for business!  It would edge up “younger” movies so that younger audiences would want to see them.  As I think Steven Spielberg himself has said, PG-13 is like hot sauce on your movie.

Coate:  Where does each Indiana Jones movie rank among the series?  Among director Steven Spielberg's body of work?

Higgins:  Raiders is clearly the best of the series.  Jaws is the best of Spielberg’s genre films, with Raiders just under that.

Lichtenfeld:  Ranking the Indy movies is harder for me than it should be.  On the one hand, Raiders is clearly a masterpiece that leaves Temple of Doom and Last Crusade duking it out for second place.  I’d give the edge to Temple, because it may be much more flawed than Crusade, but it’s also more daring.  And it looks and feels like a movie with a capital M.  Crusade, on the other hand, feels less ambitious.  And while it’s a much more polished machine than Temple, it’s also a little too safe.  It’s very enjoyable, but Temple is more sumptuous, and of the sequels, it’s the one I respect most.

On an (even more) subjective level, though, I’ve seen Raiders so many times, and studied it so closely, that if I had to pick one to see on the big screen right now, it would be Temple.  In fact, whenever the movies are screened in Los Angeles, it’s Temple that’s the draw for me — and I say that having been the host and moderator for the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ 30th anniversary celebration of Raiders of the Lost Ark!

Coate:  Was it an ideal choice to eliminate Marion from Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom?

Higgins:  It still boggles the mind.

Lichtenfeld:  Was it ideal to eliminate Marion? I don’t know. Show me the version that has her in it, and I can answer that!   But ultimately, I do think it was a good choice.  The charm of these movies is that each one is, essentially, a standalone adventure.  Fans refer to the first three as “the trilogy,” but it’s not really a trilogy — not in the sense that Star Wars or Back to the Future or Star Trek II-IV are.  There’s something nice about each movie starting with an unattached Indy.  He could have had one adventure since the last movie or a dozen.

Coate:  Was it essential that The Temple of Doom be a prequel?

Higgins:  This makes very little sense, actually.  For one, wouldn’t an Indy who burned magic stones using an incantation be a lot less skeptical of the whole Ark thingy?  For another, blood cults in 1930s India instead of Nazis???

Lichtenfeld:  I don’t know if it was essential that Temple be a prequel; I always thought more was made of that than was warranted.  But it was useful to make it a sequel in one respect: in this movie, as in Raiders, Indy charts a path from being cynical about the treasures he seeks to having awe for their power.  It humbles and humanizes him.  Had Temple been a typical sequel, it would have been hard to buy his jadedness after what he had witnessed (or not witnessed, as his eyes were shut!) on the island with the Ark of the Covenant.

Coate:  The sidekick, Short Round…what were the pros and cons of the character and performance?

Higgins:  Spielberg handles kids especially well, and this is a good example.  The kid sidekick is another lift from serials, and it could be precious – but Short Round is neither that precocious nor that much of a punching bag.  He works.

Lichtenfeld:  The light touch that Short Round brings offsets the darkness of the movie nicely.  And his relationship with Indy—somewhere between father-and-son and two brothers—gives the movie a warm underpinning, too.

Coate:  The heroine, Willie Scott… what were the pros and cons of the character and performance?

Higgins:  Honestly.  What was anyone thinking?  I’d like to hear someone try to defend this choice.  Admittedly, it is a really tough character to pull off – it requires subtlety and timing that Capshaw just doesn’t have.  I used to think Willie was just a terrible character and a thankless role.  I’ve changed my mind, probably because I’ve seen quite a lot of Jean Arthur, Claudette Colbert, and Barbara Stanwyck since then.  Watch The Lady Eve, or It Happened One Night and then tell me that the problem is the role.

Film frame from Temple of Doom

Lichtenfeld:  Kate Capshaw’s performance nicely distills the problems with the movie.  It’s a little all over the place, not very modulated, not disciplined enough.  And it’s too bad because Willie could have been a great foil for Indy.  Unlike Marion, she’s obviously very much at home with her femininity and her sex appeal, which made for a different dynamic between Indy and “the love interest.”  But where the movie uses her for comic relief, she comes off as shrill. Indy says it himself: “The biggest problem with her is the noise.”

Coate:  Given the late 1970s/early 1980s track record of Lucas and Spielberg, was it surprising Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom was not the top-grossing movie of 1984?

Higgins:  Going in to 1984 it seemed like the obvious box office champ, but Ghostbusters and Beverly Hills Cop were funnier and fresher, I guess.  By ‘84 Tales of the Gold Monkey had come and gone from the airwaves, and High Road to China and Romancing the Stone had been through the multiplexes. Fatigue.  Also, Capshaw.

Lichtenfeld:  Given how dark Temple skews—even darker than, say, The Empire Strikes Back — it’s not surprising to me that it wasn’t the top-grossing movie of its year.  What’s interesting to me is that even with its darkness, and the controversy surrounding it, an R-rated movie ended up being the top grossing film of the year—and for only one of two times in the entire decade.

Coate:  Should there be more Indiana Jones movies?

Higgins:  NO.

Lichtenfeld:  It’s tempting to say yes. Who wouldn’t want to hear the Raiders March issuing from a movie theater sound system again?  But there probably shouldn’t be.  Rightly or wrongly, the fourth one is a much maligned movie, but one moment I’ve always liked a lot is when Indy’s friend says, “We seem to have reached the age where life stops giving us things and starts taking them away.”  At this point, it may be that the most graceful thing the franchise can do is resist the urge to prove that idea wrong.

Coate:  What is the legacy of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom?

Lichtenfeld:  I think its legacy is the PG-13 rating — which the movie didn’t even have!  Unfortunately, I don’t think Temple of Doom is remembered the way it should be.  It’s generally seen as the weakest of the (first) three, and I think that’s unfair.  It doesn’t help that Spielberg has basically disowned it.  I wish he’d stick up for it more!  There are a lot of gems to be mined from it—which is a pretty apt metaphor for this movie, when you think about it.

Temple of Doom DVD    Temple of Doom Blu-ray    Temple of Doom soundtrack CD

 

SPECIAL THANKS:

Raymond Caple, Miguel Carrara, Nick DiMaggio, Scott Higgins, Bill Kretzel, Eric Lichtenfeld, Jim Perry, Tim Schafbuch, and a huge thank you to all of the librarians who helped with the research for this project.

 

SOURCES/REFERENCES:

Numerous newspaper articles, film reviews and theater advertisements; Bantha Tracks, Boxofficemojo, The Hollywood Reporter, Time, Variety, and The Wall Street Journal; the books The Complete Making of Indiana Jones: The Definitive Story Behind All Four Films (Ballantine/Del Rey, 2008) and George Lucas’s Blockbusting: A Decade-by-Decade Survey of Timeless Movies Including Untold Secrets of Their Financial and Cultural Success (George Lucas Books/Harper Collins, 2010); the films Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984, Lucasfilm Ltd./Paramount Pictures) and The Making of Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom (1984, Lucasfilm Ltd./Paramount Pictures).

- Michael Coate


          

Still the Ultimate Trip: Remembering “2001: A Space Odyssey” on its 50th Anniversary   

Cache   

2001: A Space Odyssey one sheet

2001 is Kubrick’s crowning achievement. It’s the movie that launched him into ’superstar’ status that placed him alongside the likes of Welles, Bergman, Fellini, Kurosawa, Hitchcock, Ford...” — film historian and author Raymond Benson

The Digital Bits and History, Legacy & Showmanship are pleased to present this retrospective commemorating the golden anniversary of the release of 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick’s acclaimed science-fiction adventure starring Keir Dullea and Gary Lockwood.

Featuring groundbreaking visual effects and memorable usage of classical music (and decades of analysis), 2001 premiered 50 years ago this week, and for the occasion The Bits features a compilation of statistics and box office data that places the movie’s performance in context; passages from vintage film reviews; and a reference/historical listing of the movie’s limited-market 70-millimeter and roadshow engagements. [Read on here...]

Finally, there is an interview segment with a quartet of film historians and Kubrick authorities who discuss the film’s impact and influence.

Director Stanley Kubrick on the set of 2001: A Space Odyssey

 

2001 NUMBER$

  • 1= Box-office rank among films directed by Stanley Kubrick
  • 1 = Number of Academy Awards
  • 1 = Number of sequels
  • 1 = Rank among top-earning films of 1968 (lifetime earnings)
  • 1 = Rank on AFI’s Top Sci-Fi Films
  • 3 = Number of theaters showing 2001 during opening week
  • 4 = Number of Academy Award nominations
  • 6 = Rank among MGM’s all-time top-earning movies at close of original run
  • 10 = Rank among top-earning films of 1968 (calendar year)
  • 13 = Rank of HAL 9000 on AFI’s 100 Greatest Villains
  • 17 = Peak all-time box-office chart position
  • 22 = Rank on AFI’s 100 Greatest American Movies of All Time
  • 33 = Rank among top-earning movies of the 1960s (earnings from 1/1/60 – 12/31/69)
  • 103 = Number of 70mm prints for domestic first-run
  • 127 = Number of weeks of longest-running engagement
  • 148 = Rank on current list of all-time top-grossing films (adjusted for inflation)
  • $8.5 million = Box-office rental (through 12/31/68)
  • $12.0 million = Production cost
  • $14.5 million = Box-office rental (through 12/31/69)
  • $17.5 million = Box-office rental (through 12/31/70)
  • $21.5 million = Box-office rental (through 12/31/71)
  • $24.1 million = Box-office rental (through 12/31/80)
  • $25.5 million = Box-office rental (through 12/31/96)
  • $56.9 million = Box-office gross (lifetime)
  • $85.9 million = Production cost (adjusted for inflation)
  • $155.5 million = Box-office rental (adjusted for inflation)
  • $407.1 million = Box-office gross (adjusted for inflation)

 

Director Stanley Kubrick, writer Arthur C. Clarke & members of the 2001: A Space Odyssey production team

 

A SAMPLING OF MOVIE REVIEWER QUOTES

“Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey is the picture which science-fiction enthusiasts of every age and in every corner of the world have prayed (sometimes forlornly) that the industry might one day give them.” — Charles Champlin, Los Angeles Times

2001: A Space Odyssey is a thoroughly uninteresting failure, and the most damning demonstration yet of Stanley Kubrick’s inability to tell a story coherently and with a consistent point of view. His film is not a film at all, but merely a pretext for a pictorial spread in Life magazine.” — Andrew Sarris, Village Voice

“Kubrick’s special effects border on the miraculous — a quantum leap in quality over any other science fiction film ever made!” — Joseph Morgenstern, Newsweek

“The movie is so completely absorbed in its own problems, its use of color and space, its fanatical devotion to science-fiction detail, that it is somewhere between hypnotic and immensely boring.” — Renata Adler, The New York Times

“A fantastic movie about man’s future! An unprecedented psychedelic roller coaster of an experience!” — Life

“A film that is so dull, it even dulls our interest in the technical ingenuity for the sake of which Kubrick has allowed it to become dull.” — Stanley Kauffmann, The New Republic

2001: A Space Odyssey provides the screen with some of the most dazzling visual happenings and technical achievements in the history of the motion picture!” — Time

“Is a work of art possible if pseudo-science and the technology of moviemaking become more important to the ’artist’ than man? This is central to the failure of 2001. It’s a monumentally unimaginative movie: Kubrick, with his $750,000 centrifuge, and in love with gigantic hardware and control panels, is the Belasco of science fiction.” — Pauline Kael, The New Yorker

2001: A Space Odyssey is a gorgeous, exhilarating and mind-stretching spectacle.” — Emerson Beauchamp, The Washington Star

“A regrettable failure, although not a total one. This film is fascinating when it concentrates on apes and machines…and dreadful when it deals with the in-betweens: humans.” — John Simon, New Leader

“A uniquely poetic piece of sci-fi…hypnotically entertaining!” — Penelope Gilliatt, The New Yorker

2001: A Space Odyssey is not a cinematic landmark. It compares with, but does not best, previous efforts at science fiction; lacking the humanity of Forbidden Planet, the imagination of Things to Come and the simplicity of Of Stars and Men, it actually belongs to the technically-slick group previously dominated by George Pal and the Japanese.” — Robert B. Frederick, Variety

2001: A Space Odyssey is without a doubt one of the most controversial, enigmatic and cinematically impressive films ever made. Kubrick spent four years and $10 million putting it together and the result is 140 minutes of technical achievement that is a milestone in movie history.” — John Hinterberger, The Seattle Times

“The sound track is a mish-mash of pseudo-church electronic music and, incredibly, Strauss waltzes. Imagine whirling through space to schmaltz in three-quarter time!” — Kathleen Carroll, New York Daily News

“Since 2001: A Space Odyssey has a somewhat grandiose title and a rather antiseptic start, there’s no hint of its eventual entertainment. It turns out to the ultimate in science-fiction.” — Alta Maloney, The Boston Herald

“Lacking a focus and conclusion that can be understood, the picture wanders and exhausts its audience. Since this the first time that director Stanley Kubrick has lost touch with any large part of the audience, one can only guess that the space journey theme hypnotized him. And while under this mighty influence he stubbed his toe.” — Archer Winsten, New York Post

“The fascinating thing about this film is that it fails on the human level but succeeds magnificently on a cosmic scale.” — Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

“Kubrick’s futuristic film operates on three levels: The scientific, the philosophic and the dramatic. In my opinion, it is more successful on the first two levels than on the third, but two for three is good enough for the major leagues — and Kubrick definitely is a major leaguer.” — James Meade, The San Diego Union

A scene from 2001: A Space Odyssey

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A scene from 2001: A Space Odyssey

 

THE ORIGINAL 70MM ENGAGEMENTS

Presented here is a chronological listing of 2001: A Space Odyssey’s North American first-run 70-millimeter six-track stereophonic sound presentations. These were “hard ticket” roadshow engagements (except where noted otherwise) and were special, long-running, showcase presentations in major cities prior to the film being exhibited as a general release, and they featured advanced admission pricing, an overture/intermission/entr’acte/exit music, and an average of just ten scheduled screenings per week. As well, souvenir program booklets were sold. (There were also roadshow engagements of 2001 that utilized standard 35mm prints but these have not been included in this work.)

Out of the hundreds of films released during 1968, 2001 was among only fourteen that were given deluxe roadshow treatment and among only eleven released with 70mm prints. The duration of these engagements (measured in weeks) has been included for most of the entries to give a sense of how successful the film was in its first phase of release.

The film’s anniversary offers an opportunity to namedrop some famous cinemas (nearly all of which are now closed), to offer some nostalgia for those who saw the film during this phase of its original release, and to reflect on how the film industry has evolved the manner in which event and prestige films are treated.

2001: A Space Odyssey premiere ad

Opening date YYYY-MM-DD … City — Cinema (duration in weeks)

m/o = a move-over engagement (i.e. a continuation of a booking from another cinema in same city/market)

*Advertised as a Cinerama presentation
**Advertised as a 70mm presentation
***Presentation format unadvertised
****Advertised as a Vistarama presentation
*****Advertised as a Dimension 150 presentation

A scene from 2001: A Space Odyssey

  • 1968-04-02 … Washington, DC — Uptown* (52)
  • 1968-04-03 … New York, NY — Capitol* (24)
  • 1968-04-04 … Los Angeles, CA — Warner Hollywood* (80)
  • 1968-04-10 … Boston, MA — Boston* (36)
  • 1968-04-10 … Denver, CO — Cooper* (47)
  • 1968-04-10 … Detroit, MI — Summit* (47)
  • 1968-04-10 … Houston, TX — Windsor* (31)
  • 1968-04-11 … Chicago, IL — Cinestage* (36)
  • 1968-05-22 … Philadelphia, PA — Randolph* (30)
  • 1968-05-28 … San Diego, CA — Center* (44)
  • 1968-05-28 … Seattle, WA — Cinerama* (77)
  • 1968-05-29 … Atlanta, GA — Martin Cinerama* (22)
  • 1968-05-29 … Baltimore, MD — Town* (20)
  • 1968-05-29 … Cincinnati, OH — International 70* (19)
  • 1968-05-29 … Dallas, TX — Capri* (24)
  • 1968-05-29 … Miami Beach, FL — Sheridan* (23)
  • 1968-05-29 … Montreal, QC — Imperial* (24)
  • 1968-05-29 … New Orleans, LA — Cinerama* (29)
  • 1968-05-29 … Providence, RI — Cinerama* (20)
  • 1968-05-29 … St. Louis, MO — Cinerama* (29)
  • 1968-05-29 … Scottsdale, AZ — Kachina* (25)
  • 1968-05-30 … Toronto, ON — Glendale* (127)

2001: A Space Odyssey theater ad

  • 1968-06-06 … Charlotte, NC — Carolina* (13)
  • 1968-06-07 … Honolulu, HI — Cinerama* (29)
  • 1968-06-12 … Birmingham, AL — Eastwood Mall* (8)
  • 1968-06-12 … Columbus, OH — Grand* (27)
  • 1968-06-12 … Dayton, OH — Dabel* (20)
  • 1968-06-12 … Harrisburg, PA — Trans-Lux* (15)
  • 1968-06-12 … Jacksonville, FL — 5 Points* (14)
  • 1968-06-12 … Kansas City, MO — Empire 2* (27)
  • 1968-06-12 … Pittsburgh, PA — Warner* (22)
  • 1968-06-12 … Salt Lake City, UT — Villa* (22)
  • 1968-06-12 … Tampa, FL — Palace* (15)
  • 1968-06-12 … Toledo, OH — Showcase 1* (14)
  • 1968-06-13 … Portland, OR — Hollywood* (42)
  • 1968-06-19 … Buffalo, NY — Century* (13)
  • 1968-06-19 … Cleveland, OH — State* (21)
  • 1968-06-19 … Hartford, CT — Cinerama* (26)
  • 1968-06-19 … Norfolk, VA — Rosna* (25)
  • 1968-06-19 … Omaha, NE — Indian Hills* (17)
  • 1968-06-19 … San Francisco, CA — Golden Gate* (73)
  • 1968-06-19 … Wichita, KS — Uptown* (15)
  • 1968-06-26 … Calgary, AB — North Hill* (14)
  • 1968-06-26 … Des Moines, IA — River Hills* (20)
  • 1968-06-26 … Fresno, CA — Warnor* (17)
  • 1968-06-26 … Hicksville, NY — Twin South* (39)
  • 1968-06-26 … London, ON — Park* (8)
  • 1968-06-26 … Louisville, KY — Showcase 1* (14)
  • 1968-06-26 … Milwaukee, WI — Wisconsin 1* (25)
  • 1968-06-26 … Sacramento, CA — Esquire* (35)
  • 1968-06-26 … St. Louis Park, MN — Cooper* (31)
  • 1968-06-26 … Syracuse, NY — Eckel* (10)
  • 1968-06-26 … Tulsa, OK — Fox* (15)
  • 1968-06-26 … Vancouver, BC — Capitol* (15)
  • 1968-06-27 … Indianapolis, IN — Indiana* (20)
  • 1968-06-27 … Nashville, TN — Belle Meade* (13)
  • 1968-06-28 … Huntsville, AL — Westbury* (9)
  • 1968-07-02 … Las Vegas, NV — Cinerama* (15)
  • 1968-07-10 … Chattanooga, TN — Brainerd* (11)
  • 1968-07-11 … Shreveport, LA — Broadmoor** (8)
  • 1968-07-16 … Oklahoma City, OK — Cooper* (33)
  • 1968-07-17 … Montclair, NJ — Clairidge* (36)
  • 1968-07-17 … San Antonio, TX — North Star II** (18)
  • 1968-07-18 … Richmond, VA — Westhampton*** (10)
  • 1968-07-23 … San Jose, CA — Century 21* (87)
  • 1968-07-24 … Knoxville, TN — Capri-70* (9)
  • 1968-07-24 … Raleigh, NC — Ambassador** (10)
  • 1968-07-25 … Memphis, TN — Paramount**** (11)
  • 1968-07-25 … Winnipeg, MB — Garrick** (8)
  • 1968-07-31 … Evansville, IN — Ross*** (8)
  • 1968-07-31 … West Springfield, MA — Showcase 1* (12)
  • 1968-08-07 … Springfield, IL — Esquire** (8)
  • 1968-08-09 … Grand Forks, ND — Cinema International**
  • 1968-08-09 … Orlando, FL — Beacham* (11)
  • 1968-08-14 … Austin, TX — Americana** (13)
  • 1968-08-21 … Albany, NY — Hellman** (12)
  • 1968-08-21 … Cuyahoga Falls, OH — Falls* (17)
  • 1968-08-22 … Grand Rapids, MI — Eastbrook** (6)
  • 1968-08-22 … Lubbock, TX — Winchester*** (11)
  • 1968-08-28 … Lawrence, MA — Showcase 1* (12)

2001: A Space Odyssey theater showing

  • 1968-09-04 … Reno, NV — Century 21* (9)
  • 1968-09-16 … New York, NY — Cinerama* (m/o from Capitol, 13 [37])
  • 1968-09-18 … Worcester, MA — Showcase 2* (13)
  • 1968-09-25 … Edmonton, AB — Paramount** (8)
  • 1968-09-25 … Hamden, CT — Cinemart** (13)
  • 1968-09-25 … Ottawa, ON — Nelson** (12)
  • 1968-09-25 … Youngstown, OH — Paramount** (8)
  • 1968-09-27 … Reading, PA — Fox** (5)
  • 1968-10-02 … Albuquerque, NM — Fox Winrock* (13)
  • 1968-10-02 … Lexington, KY — Strand*** (7)
  • 1968-10-02 … Scranton, PA — Strand** (5)
  • 1968-10-09 … El Paso, TX — Fox Bassett Center*** (11) [unreserved seating]
  • 1968-10-17 … Penfield, NY — Panorama* (17)
  • 1968-10-25 … St. Petersburg, FL — Center** (9)
  • 1968-10-30 … Eugene, OR — Oakway*** (4) [unreserved seating]
  • 1968-10-30 … Fargo, ND — Cinema 70* (5)
  • 1968-10-30 … Little Rock, AR — Cinema 150***** (7) [unreserved seating]
  • 1968-10-30 … Milan, IL — Showcase 1* (7)
  • 1968-11-06 … Corpus Christi, TX — Deux Cine II*** (7)
  • 1968-11-06 … Monterey, CA — Cinema 70*** (13)
  • 1968-11-07 … Greensboro, NC — Terrace** (3) [unreserved seating]
  • 1968-11-08 … Cedar Rapids, IA — Times 70*** (9)
  • 1968-11-08 … Columbia, SC — Richland Mall** (3) [unreserved seating]
  • 1968-11-13 … Waco, TX — 25th Street*** (4) [unreserved seating]
  • 1968-11-14 … Augusta, GA — National Hills** (6) [unreserved seating]
  • 1968-11-20 … Tucson, AZ — El Dorado*** (9)

2001: A Space Odyssey roadshow tickets

  • 1968-12-18 … Nanuet, NY — Route 59** (9)
  • 1968-12-20 … Kokomo, IN — Markland Mall II** (3) [unreserved seating]
  • 1968-12-29 … Odessa, TX — Grandview*** (3)
  • 1968-12-31 … Mason City, IA — Park 70** (2) [unreserved seating]
  • 1969-01-08 … Wichita Falls, TX — State*** (3) [unreserved seating]
  • 1969-01-09 … North Charleston, SC — Pinehaven*** (3) [unreserved seating]
  • 1969-01-15 … Hamilton, ON — Centre Twin West** (8)
  • 1969-02-19 … Modesto, CA — Briggsmore** (5) [unreserved seating]
  • 1969-02-19 … St. Cloud, MN — Cinema 70** (2) [unreserved seating]
  • 1969-03-14 … Colorado Springs, CO — Ute 70*** (4) [unreserved seating]
  • 1969-09-30 … Oakland, CA — Century 21* (11)
  • 1969-10-14 … Orange, CA — Cinedome 21* (27)
  • 1969-10-29 … Beverly Hills, CA — Beverly Hills** (m/o from Warner Hollywood, 23 [103])
  • 1969-11-11 … San Francisco, CA — Golden Gate Penthouse** (m/o from Golden Gate, 15 [88])
  • 1969-12-17 … Pleasant Hill, CA — Century 21* (13) [unreserved seating]

Note that during the engagement the Warner Hollywood’s name was changed to Hollywood Pacific.

Promotion for 2001: A Space Odyssey

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A scene from 2001: A Space Odyssey

 

The domestic general release of 2001: A Space Odyssey commenced in autumn 1968 and continued into 1969. Numerous re-releases and countless revival screenings followed.

While not a complete listing, what follows are details of some of the key international roadshow engagements of 2001.

  • 1968-04-10 … Tokyo, Japan — Theatre Tokyo* (24)
  • 1968-04-11 … Johannesburg, South Africa — Royal*
  • 1968-05-01 … London, UK — Casino* (47)
  • 1968-05-01 … Sydney, Australia — Plaza* (12)
  • 1968-05-02 … Melbourne, Australia — Plaza* (11)
  • 1968-07-03 … San Juan, Puerto Rico — Metro**
  • 1968-07-04 … Sao Paulo, Brazil — Majestic*
  • 1968-07-25 … Dublin, Ireland — Plaza*
  • 1968-08-09 … Auckland, New Zealand — Cinerama*
  • 1968-08-24 … Vienna, Austria — Gartenbau*
  • 1968-08-27 … Stockholm, Sweden — Vinterpalatset*
  • 1968-09-02 … Brussels, Belgium — Varietes* (10)
  • 1968-09-11 … Munich, West Germany — Royal* (12)
  • 1968-09-25 … Zuerich, Switzerland — Apollo*
  • 1968-09-27 … Paris, France — Empire* (12) [Version Originale]
  • 1968-09-27 … Paris, France — Gaumont Palace* [Version Francaise]
  • 1968-10-17 … Barcelona, Spain — Florida*
  • 1968-10-31 … Mexico City, Mexico — Cine Latino***** (15)
  • 1968-11-07 … Buenos Aires, Argentina — Ideal*
  • 1968-12-11 … Milan, Italy — Alcione*
  • 1968-12-11 … Rome, Italy — Royal*
  • 1968-12-12 … Frankfurt, West Germany — MGM* (10)

 

2001: A Space Odyssey writer Arthur C. Clarke

 

THE Q&A

Chris BarsantiChris Barsanti is the author of The Sci-Fi Movie Guide: The Universe of Film from Alien to Zardoz (Visible Ink; 2014).

His other books include Filmology: A Movie-a-Day Guide (Adams Media; 2010), Handy New York City Answer Book (Visible Ink; 2017), and (with Brian Cogan and Jeff Massey) Monty Python FAQ: All That’s Left to Know about Spam, Grails, Spam, Nudging, Bruces, and Spam (Applause; 2017).

He is a member of the National Book Critics Circle, Online Film Critics Society and New York Film Critics Online, and has written for Film Journal International, Film Threat and The Hollywood Reporter.

 

Raymond BendonRaymond Benson is a college-level film history instructor (who includes a screening of 2001: A Space Odyssey in his curriculum) and author of three-dozen books.

He is the third — and first American — continuation author of official James Bond novels.

His new original thriller In the Hush of the Night will be published in May by Skyhorse Publishing.

 

 

Peter KrämerPeter Krämer is the author and editor of eight academic books, including the BFI Film Classics volume on 2001: A Space Odyssey (published in 2010).

He is a Senior Fellow in the School of Art, Media and American Studies at the University of East Anglia in Norwich (UK).

His other books include The New Hollywood: From Bonnie and Clyde to Star Wars (Wallflower, 2006) and American Graffiti: George Lucas, the New Hollywood and the Baby Boom Generation (forthcoming from Routledge).

 

 

Lee Pfeiffer is the co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of Cinema Retro magazine, which celebrates films of the 1960s and 1970s and is “the Essential Guide to Cult and Classic Movies.”

He is the author of several books including The Films of Sean Connery (Citadel, 2001) and (with Dave Worrall) The Essential Bond: The Authorized Guide to the World of 007 (Boxtree, 1998/Harper Collins, 1999) and (with Philip Lisa) The Incredible World of 007: An Authorized Celebration of James Bond (Citadel, 1992).

Lee Pfeiffer

The interviews were conducted separately and have been edited into a “roundtable” conversation format.

 

A scene from 2001: A Space Odyssey

Michael Coate (The Digital Bits): How do you think 2001: A Space Odyssey should be remembered on its golden anniversary?

Chris Barsanti: As the first time that science fiction cinema was taken seriously. The genre had taken itself seriously before and was occasionally rewarded for it — all the talk about how Forbidden Planet was inspired by The Tempest, for instance. But it wasn’t until 2001 that the genre came to be seen as a body of work that could be based as much on the wonderment of ideas as on the whiz-bang of special effects and extraterrestrials.

Raymond Benson: 2001: A Space Odyssey is a landmark film that pushed many envelopes and is still today a divisive motion picture. Any work of art that can generate debate and passionate opinions about it after 50 years must be doing something right. I’ve always felt it was much more than just “a movie.” Stanley Kubrick got us to examine and appreciate the mystery of the universe and our place in it, and he got us to ask questions about the meaning of life, our past, and our future. Heady stuff, both profound and daring for a Hollywood “mainstream” big-budget motion picture. As one critic put it, Kubrick made the most expensive “art house movie” ever.

2001: The infamous "Jump Cut"Peter Krämer: As one of the greatest movies of all time. As a key source for much of the science fiction cinema of recent decades, from Star Wars to Avatar and beyond. As a film that has dazzled and inspired people for many years.

At the same time, we should not forget that upon its initial release 50 years ago, the film reached out to, and found, a huge audience in the United States. Many people, including many film scholars, think that the film was initially rejected both by critics and by cinemagoers and only belatedly found an audience, largely composed of young people, many of which are said to have watched the film under the influence of mind-altering substances.

When I carefully examined reports in the film industry trade press, box office figures and the many letters that cinemagoers wrote to Stanley Kubrick after seeing his film, I had to conclude that in fact 2001 was a massive success from the outset, not only with countercultural youth, but also, for example, with young children and their parents.

We also have to remember that in the United States the film was first presented as a so-called roadshow, which meant that it was initially shown, at raised ticket prices, in only very few cinemas, most of them Cinerama theaters with their huge curved screens; the show began with an overture and included an intermission. This way of presenting a film was typical for Hollywood’s biggest productions, and it actually was a special occasion for all those people who had lost their cinema going habit to return to the big screen. This film was really meant for everyone!

Finally, going against all those critics who understand the film as being infused with Kubrick’s characteristic pessimism, we should really remember it as a statement of hope. Kubrick made 2001 in response to the utterly devastating conclusion of his previous film Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb from 1964; this film ends with the explosion of a nuclear “doomsday device” which will bring an end to all human life on the surface of the Earth.

My research in the Stanley Kubrick Archive at the University of the Arts London strongly suggests that Kubrick intended 2001 to offer an optimistic vision of the future to counter the deep pessimism of Dr. Strangelove. And that’s exactly how many people writing to Kubrick about their experiences with the film understood it. It gave them hope about their own future, their ability to change, to renew themselves, and about the future of humanity as a whole. We should remember 2001 as a hopeful vision of boundless human potential.

Lee Pfeiffer: 2001 is innovative, inspired filmmaking at its zenith. Kubrick wanted to make the most unique, intelligent take on the science fiction genre and he truly succeeded. It’s easy to see why the movie initially alienated audiences that were probably expecting another film about little green men with ray guns. What they got was something that made them think. For that reason, the movie wasn’t shaping up as a major hit until young people discovered it and relished the technical aspects of it. The film fit right in with the hippie drug culture of the late 1960s. I’d like to think many of the people who made the film a major success were actually looking beyond the apparent achievement in special effects and tried to diagnose what it was all about. The beauty of 2001 is that there are no easy answers. It parallels Patrick McGoohan’s classic TV series The Prisoner, which was telecast a year earlier, in that the answers lie in the mind of the individual viewer, thus it can mean completely different things to different people. I’m not sure what the hell it’s all about, either...but it’s a fascinating experience each time I see it. The effects were state-of-the-art in 1968 and are even more impressive today. We live in an era in which effects can be generated on computers, whereas Kubrick and his team achieved everything the old-fashioned way — and it’s never been equaled.

A scene from 2001: A Space Odyssey

Coate: What did you think of 2001 when you (first) saw it?

Barsanti: I can’t [recall when I first saw it]. Like other big-screen classics of the 1950s and ’60s like Dr. Strangelove or Bridge on the River Kwai, to me, 2001 was just always part of my movie consciousness. I was definitely very young when I first saw it, which is not a bad thing. While the movie is devilishly complex in some of its thinking, it’s also incredibly simple: Aliens come to earth and help humans evolve. Later, humans go to space and get a little ahead of themselves. They meet an alien — or aliens. Cue lightshow. Even a five-year-old gets that. Also, the scene of the primate hurling the bone into the sky and having it return as a spacecraft was probably my first awareness of what editing could do.

Stanley Kubrick directing a scene from 2001Benson: I saw it on first release in Odessa, Texas, with my father, in 70mm. I was 13 years old. I already loved movies and was just beginning to have an appreciation for the many aspects that went into the making of a film — not just whether or not it entertained me. I believe that 2001 gave me a better understanding of what “Directed By” means. From that point on, I became interested in who Stanley Kubrick was. As I grew older, I sought out his earlier films and kept up with his career until the end. Curiously, when I first saw 2001, I had no problem “getting” it. As we were leaving the theater, my father asked me if I understood the movie — he hadn’t, although he found it amazing and was entranced by the picture all the way through. I explained my interpretation to him, and he was impressed. During that first release, all my friends my age “didn’t understand it,” but they all liked it. It was too much of a never-before-seen cinematic experience not to like.

Krämer: I first saw 2001 as a teenager at a small-town cinema in Germany in the late 1970s. I really did not know what to make of it, although I had already long been a science fiction fan, mostly of novels, though, not of films. I was strangely moved, and, I think for the first time in my life, I went back to the cinema to see the same film again. I also read Arthur C. Clarke’s novel, which explained everything that was going on in the film. But somehow these explanations weren’t very satisfactory. The mysteries of the film were more interesting and engaging when left unexplained.

The whole experience was so unusual for me that I started to think more seriously about films. Round about the same time I also watched Kubrick’s next film, A Clockwork Orange, which blew me away, but also unsettled me. Together, these two cinema experiences are probably the main reason why I eventually decided to study film and become a film scholar.

Coate: In what way is 2001 a significant motion picture?

Benson: As has often been said, Kubrick set out to make a non-verbal, visual experience that would fill an audience with awe. He experimented with the narrative structure and told the basic story in strictly visual terms — which people in 1968 were not really used to since silent films ended in the late 1920s. The dialogue in the movie barely informs on the story. It’s all visual clues that tell us what’s going on. Add to that the technical perfection that Kubrick brought to the production...nothing like it had been done before. With his obsession for scientific accuracy, the ground-breaking visual effects work, the use of classical music as a soundtrack that previously really hadn’t been utilized in this way, the courageous use of sound (or silence) in the space sequences, and the existential themes inherent in the story — 2001 is truly one of the most outstanding achievements in cinema history.

A scene from 2001: A Space Odyssey

 

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A scene from 2001: A Space Odyssey

 

Coate: In what way was Stanley Kubrick an ideal choice to direct 2001 and where does the film rank among his body of work?

Barsanti: Kubrick is probably the only director at that time who was comfortable with trimming away all the extraneous plotting that other filmmakers would have tagged on to this journey. He was after spectacle and discovery and expansion of consciousness: some subplot about the broken family Dave had left behind on Earth would have just cluttered things up. In terms of his body of work, 2001 is the last great thing Kubrick achieved. After this, his body of work became increasingly self-indulgent and dry, without the dark wit and sparkle of his earlier movies and little of 2001’s visual and philosophical grandeur.

Benson: I believe 2001 is Kubrick’s crowning achievement. It’s the movie that launched him into “superstar” status that placed him alongside the likes of Welles, Bergman, Fellini, Kurosawa, Hitchcock, Ford... I can’t imagine anyone else directing the film or even conceiving of it, for the picture is full of many of Kubrick’s thematic signatures — man’s inhumanity to man, the flaws of being human, how technology can be a danger — but I also think he uses these themes, at the end of the picture, in an optimistic way. There is hope for mankind in the final image of the Star-Child. Man will evolve into something greater. Someday. Maybe.

Stanley Kubrick with William Sylvester on a break filming 2001Krämer: I don’t think one can say that Kubrick was “chosen” to direct 2001. He developed the whole project from scratch. Soon after the release of Dr. Strangelove, he contacted Arthur C. Clarke, one of the world’s leading science fiction writers and also the author of many popular science books, and asked him whether he wanted to collaborate on developing a story for a science fiction film which would center on humanity’s encounter with an extraterrestrial civilization.

As is evidenced by many public and private statements, Kubrick was deeply convinced that humanity was very likely to destroy itself in an all-encompassing nuclear war in the not too distant future, and in Dr. Strangelove he had shown how this might happen. But he also felt that there was a slim chance that humanity might be transformed and avoid this terrible fate.

Well, if you are convinced that humanity will destroy itself on Earth, where do you look for an alternative? To heaven, of course. If you are religious, you might hope for God’s intervention. If not (and neither Kubrick nor Clarke were religious), you hope for an encounter with something transformative in space, or perhaps you hope that simply going into space might give humanity a new perspective and thus transform it. That was, I am convinced, the main driving force behind the making of 2001.

It is also the case that only Kubrick would have been able to make a film like this at this point in time. This was a big budget movie from the outset, and it nominally belonged to a genre — science fiction — which, with very few exceptions, had never done particularly well at the box office. But Kubrick had an excellent commercial track record; his last three films — Dr. Strangelove, Lolita and Spartacus — had all been hits, and he was also already widely regarded as one of the greatest American filmmakers. So he managed to get MGM to finance what was initially called Journey Beyond the Stars. And then he took much, much longer than expected and went massively over budget. But in the light of Kubrick’s reputation and track record, the studio did not interfere.

And then he did something so amazing that even today I completely baffled. For several years, 2001 was meant to have had a prologue showing interviews with scientists talking about topics important for understanding the film, a voiceover narration which explained and commented on what was happening in the story, long dialogue sequences which did the same, and a conventional score. But not long before the film’s release in April 1968, Kubrick, one after the other, removed all these elements. He thought that the film would work better if it was just as mysterious as the monoliths at the center of its story (and the pre-recorded music he used, especially Ligeti’s eerie compositions, really helped to create this mystery, already starting with the overture).

It is truly astonishing that even at this point MGM didn’t interfere to protect the huge investment the studio had made. But either the top executives trusted Kubrick’s judgment that this mysterious film would work with a mass audience, or they were simply too caught up in internal power struggles to have much time for 2001. As it turned out, Kubrick was right. 2001 became one of the highest grossing films of all time in the United States.

Pfeiffer: Some years ago, I was writing and co-producing a documentary for Sony about the making of Dr. Strangelove. Among the people we interviewed was Roger Caras, a former executive in publicity for Columbia Pictures. Kubrick had been impressed with the offbeat ad campaign Roger had overseen for Strangelove, a minimalist cartoon that depicted the U.S President and Soviet Premier both on the Hot Line. Shortly thereafter, Kubrick took Roger to lunch at Trader Vic’s in New York City, ostensibly for lunch. However, he had another purpose. He informed Roger that his next film would be his most ambitious and would involve space travel and have a very existential aspect to it. Roger very much respected Kubrick’s instincts and listened intently as Kubrick outlined the bare-bones scenario for what would become 2001: A Space Odyssey. Kubrick explained that he didn’t want this to be some kind of sci-fi thriller, but the most intelligent examination of the space age ever undertaken. Furthermore, his original concept (dropped from the finished film) would center on the first meeting between human beings and aliens. Roger said that Kubrick drew some rough “stick man”-like figures on the back of a Trader Vic’s napkin to illustrate the fact that the aliens would be much taller than a human being.

As the conversation continued, Kubrick shocked Roger by imploring him to quit his executive position at Columbia to work full time on the space film project, which was untitled at that time (this was 1964). Kubrick assured him that it would take years from concept to completion. He also said he wanted Roger to fly to different nations to interview prominent scientists for a prologue he intended to use in the finished film. It was important to Kubrick that the movie had gravitas and be grounded in realistic scientific concepts. Roger came home and informed his shocked wife that he was indeed going to quit his job and work with Kubrick. His rationale: Kubrick was the only true genius he had ever known. Not just a filmmaking genius, but a genuine genius who was conversant in virtually every subject. Roger had been friendly with the writer Arthur C. Clarke, who lived in Ceylon. He told Kubrick to read his works and Kubrick did just that. He was impressed by a story Clark had written, The Sentinel and contacted the author about the possibility of using it as an inspiration for his space film. Clarke was so enthused about the project that he agreed to co-author the screenplay with Kubrick. The rest, as they say, is history. The interviews with scientists that Roger had so painstakingly completed were also cut before the release print was finalized because a screening with MGM executives resulted in the feeling that it got the movie off to a slow and turgid start. An interesting side note: when our interview with Roger Caras was complete, he went into one of his files and said he would show us something priceless. He removed the original Trader Vic’s cocktail napkins that Kubrick had doodled his concepts on. When I asked him what possessed him to keep them at the time, he said that anything in writing from Kubrick had potential historical value. He was right.

Roger Caras disputed the popular legend that Stanley Kubrick was a recluse. He acknowledged he had eccentricities but was not insulated from the world. Kubrick filmed Dr. Strangelove in England and became enamored of the UK. He would only leave the UK one more time, when he had to show the original cut of 2001 to MGM executives in America. Kubrick, a former pilot, had experienced a near-death trauma when flying his private plane. He never flew again. Roger said that for reasons Kubrick never explained, he would not travel above 30 mph in any vehicle, which made accompanying him on the road an exasperating experience. Aside from these quirks, however, Roger said Kubrick enjoyed being in a group of intelligent, eclectic people and occasionally hosted parties at his estate. Roger said it was sheer bliss seeing legends from the worlds of politics, art, cinema and literature all meeting and engaging in conversation.

A scene from 2001: A Space Odyssey

Coate: How would you describe 2001 to someone who has never seen it?

Benson: Since I screen it for young college-age film students, many have not seen it. I warn them that it is meticulously-paced, and that they will most likely find parts of it to be slow. I preface this with the fact that movies moved much slower prior to the 1980s and the advent of MTV. I explain that this has a hypnotic effect for audiences who accept the pace for what it is, settle into it, and let the movie envelop them. I then go on to say it is considered by many (including the AFI) to be the #1 science fiction film of all time, and how it leaves the audience to interpret it as they choose. Usually students are more receptive to it after a proper introduction that places the film within the context of when it was released.

Krämer: I think that today people are likely to have all kinds of preconceptions before they watch 2001, mainly to do with its status as a masterpiece and also perhaps as an expression of Kubrick’s pessimism. I wish that people could just drop these preconceptions, and approach the film as if they were going on a journey, a journey into the unknown. After all, the film has “odyssey” in its title.

One has to expect to get lost for a while on this odyssey, but one can also be certain to be returned home safely. It is best to experience each stage of the journey in its own right, because there are so many sounds and images, actions and motifs to contemplate. Perhaps one can use the intermission (which appears on most DVD and Blu-ray editions) to actually take a break and think about what one has seen and heard, and how the preceding stages of the journey relate to each other, and where the journey might go next.

At the end of the film, it is only fitting if one allows oneself to be haunted by the final image of the Star-Child looking directly at the camera and thus at the audience. One can explore how this image relates to the title shown right after the opening credit sequence: The Dawn of Man. What does all this tell us about what it means to be human? And about human history?

So my best advice would be to keep an open mind when watching 2001, to try to experience everything it has to offer, and to go away from it with many questions rather than with simple answers.

Coate: Any thoughts on the film’s sequel?

Krämer: I actually like 2010 quite a lot. The only problem is that it is pales in comparison with Kubrick’s film. It is difficult to watch it without constantly comparing it with 2001, and it is diminished by this comparison. Otherwise it is a perfectly engaging and stimulating film. I have read all the sequel novels that Clarke wrote and also the “time odyssey” novels he wrote together with Stephen Baxter. There are some wonderful ideas here, but, again, nothing quite lives up to the magical experience of watching Kubrick’s film.

Stanley Kubrick directing a scene in 2001

Coate: Has 2001 been well-served on its numerous home-video releases? Is it worth watching in the home?

Benson: It’s made to be seen on the big screen — the bigger the better — and with a good sound system. Kubrick wanted the film to overwhelm an audience. Back in the 1980s, 2001 was the first VHS tape I bought, and I really hated the pan-and-scan version. A widescreen version came out a little later, and that helped, but it was no substitute for the big screen. DVD improved this, and then we got flat screen, widescreen televisions and Blu-ray. This helped immensely. I believe that if you have a really good home theater setup with a big TV screen, sound, and Blu-ray, in a darkened room with no distractions, you can recreate a decent experience watching the film (or any film, for that matter!).

Krämer: In my experience of watching 2001 dozens of times, it works on small screens as well as on big ones. Of course, it is a very special treat to see the film on a huge screen, perhaps even on an old Cinerama screen (as I once did in Bradford in the UK). But one can also immerse oneself when watching it on a television set, especially if it is large one with good sound. I think watching it while being alone may actually add something to the experience, especially when one is confronted with the Star-Child at the end. I have to admit that I never tried to watch it on a tablet or a smart phone. I wonder what that would be like.

Coate: What is the legacy of 2001?

Benson: As said above — it remains the #1 science fiction movie of all time. For me personally it’s the #1 movie of all time because it quite frankly changed my life. I had loved motion pictures prior to 2001, but after it I became seriously interested in the craft and history of cinema. I’ve seen it maybe a hundred times, and I continue to find new things to admire. It will always inspire and move me.

Krämer: The legacy of 2001 is difficult to map, because so many people were deeply affected by this film. Some, such as myself, became film scholars. More importantly, others, such as James Cameron, became film makers (in fact I am a great admirer of Cameron’s work, and I think that Avatar is the most powerful reworking of 2001 that we have seen in a long time). There are also no doubt many people who were inspired to get into space exploration and SETI (the search for extraterrestrial intelligence) or artificial intelligence research. Judging by the letters from cinemagoers Kubrick received, numerous people also simply felt that their lives did not have to go on as before, that change was possible, that everything was possible. Who knows what they eventually did with this feeling!?

Pfeiffer: The legacy of 2001 is apparent in the fact you are doing a major article about it 50 years later. Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke strove to challenge people’s imaginations and they succeeded. There are so many landmark visuals in the film, we can’t recount them here. It’s been criticized for being a cold, antiseptic film when it comes to exploring the human condition — and it is indeed that. However, Kubrick wasn’t interested in the viewers getting under the skins of the characters. If he was, he would have cast big box office names in the lead roles. Instead, he wanted to create a film that had a legacy that would last for many years and he certainly succeeded in that. The film inspired a new generation of filmmakers and continues to do so today. Doubtless, it will continue to do so even 50 years from now.

Coate: Thank you — Chris, Raymond, Peter, and Lee — for sharing your thoughts about Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey on the occasion of its 50th anniversary.

--END--

 

IMAGES

Selected images copyright/courtesy Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, MGM/UA Home Entertainment, Stanley Kubrick Productions, Warner Home Video. 70mm frames scanned by Schauburg Archive. Home-video collage by Cliff Stephenson. Roadshow ticket stub from the collection of Robert Morrow. Raymond Benson photo by Katherine Tootelian.

2001 halbrainroom

 

SOURCES/REFERENCES

The primary references for this project were regional newspaper coverage and trade reports published in Billboard, Boxoffice, The Hollywood Reporter and Variety. All figures and data included in this article pertain to the United States and Canada except where stated otherwise. This work is based upon articles by same author previously published at In70mm.com and CinemaTreasures.org.

Director Stanley Kubrick on the set of 2001: A Space Odyssey

 

SPECIAL THANKS

Al Alvarez, Jim Barg, Chris Barsanti, Don Beelik, Raymond Benson, Kirk Besse, Herbert Born, Serge Bosschaerts, Raymond Caple, Miguel Carrara, Evans A. Criswell, Nick DiMaggio, Carlos Fresnedo, Sheldon Hall, Thomas Hauerslev, William Hooper, Bill Huelbig, Mark Huffstetler, Peter Krämer, Bill Kretzel, David Larson, Ronald A. Lee, Mark Lensenmayer, Paul Linfesty, Stan Malone, Robert Morrow, Gabriel Neeb, Jim Perry, Lee Pfeiffer, Richard Ravalli, Jochen Rudschies, Sam Shapiro, Grant Smith, Cliff Stephenson, Bob Throop, Joel Weide, and Vince Young, and an extra special thank-you to all of the librarians who helped with this project.

 

IN MEMORIAM

  • H.L. Bird (Sound Mixer), 1909-1968
  • A.W. Watkins (Sound Supervisor), 1895-1970
  • Geoffrey Unsworth (Director of Photography), 1914-1978
  • James Liggat (Casting), 1920-1981
  • Wally Veevers (Special Photographic Effects Supervisor), 1917-1983
  • Leonard Rossiter (“Dr. Andrei Smyslov”), 1926-1984
  • Sean Sullivan (“Dr. Bill Michaels”), 1921-1985
  • Tom Howard (Special Photographic Effects Supervisor), 1910-1985
  • John Alcott (Additional Photography), 1931-1986
  • Alan Gifford (“Poole’s Father”), 1911-1989
  • Tony Masters (Production Designer), 1919-1990
  • Ernest Archer (Production Designer), 1910-1990
  • Robert Beatty (“Dr. Ralph Halvorsen”), 1909-1992
  • William Sylvester (“Dr. Haywood R. Floyd”), 1922-1995
  • John Hoesli (Art Director), 1919-1997
  • Frank Miller (“Mission Controller – Voice”), 1944-1998
  • Stanley Kubrick (Writer-Producer-Director-Special Effects Designer/Director), 1928-1999
  • Winston Ryder (Sound Editor), 1915-1999
  • Ray Lovejoy (Editor), 1939-2001
  • Edward Bishop (“Aries-1B Lunar Shuttle Captain”), 1932-2005
  • Arthur C. Clarke (Writer), 1917-2008
  • Harry Lange (Production Designer), 1930-2008
  • Margaret Tyzack (“Elena”), 1931-2011
  • Bill Weston (“Astronaut”), 1941-2012
  • Stuart Freeborn (Makeup), 1914-2013
  • Frederick I. Ordway III (Scientific and Technical Consultant), 1927-2014
  • Ann Gillis (“Poole’s Mother”), 1927-2018

2001: A Space Odyssey on home video

-Michael Coate

Michael Coate can be reached via e-mail through this link. (You can also follow Michael on social media at these links: Twitter and Facebook) 

2001: A Space Odyssey (4K Ultra HD)

 


          

Loose - 2.28.19   

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Dug into my cassette archives for some weird sounds from Eastern Europe the 80's and early 90's. Ambient, industrial, hip-hop/electro, house, hardcore punk, noise, plus some other good stuff.

3:46:55 minutes (519.39 MB)

This is a scan of the cover of Lesik Hajdovsky & Manzele's first record.

  • Skupina F.R. Cecha - Sloni Bugy (Czechoslovakia)
  • Decadence - Hurricane Ethyl (Chicago)
  • Crucif*cks - Wisconsin (Michigan)
  • Soft Boys - I Wanna Destroy You (UK)
  • NSRD - Saulainais (Latvia)
  • NSRD - No Galpuunkta Uz Galpunktu (Latvia)
  • Asociaciju Sektors - Autogena Tranipa Kursi (Latvia)
  • Asociaciju Sektors -Populara Pirmdiena (Latvia)
  • Dvesele - Par Daudz Jau Sapets (Latvia)
  • Ru Dens Un Miega - Supoles (Latvia)
  • Lesik Hajdovsky & Manzele - jizak (Czechoslovakia)
  • East Bam - Vilkam Vogs Nokoda (Latvia)
  • CMC - CroMagnoni Cola (Hungary)
  • CMC - Vizallasjelenes (Hungary)
  • BP Service - Postvibration Of A City In The Shadow Of Lightwaves (Hungary)
  • A.E. Bizottzag - Linaj, Linaj, Van-Van-Van (Hungary)
  • Ventilator 202 advertisement (Yugoslavia)
  • Rex Ilusivii - Zia Kob (Yugoslavia)
  • Nukeus - Dokola Dokolechka (Czechoslovakia)
  • Vlna Bavlna - Vlasy (Czechoslovakia)
  • Disharmonic Ballet - Isolation (Czechoslovakia)
  • Partibrejkers - Radio Utopija (Yugoslavia)
  • Kryzys - Swiety Szczyt (Poland)
  • Anti-Armia - Nigozi Teraz (Poland)
  • Kultura - Nie Ha Odnoron (Poland)
  • Immanuel - Cywilizacja (Poland)
  • Kryzys - Telewiziya (Poland)
  • Хуго Уго - Мне Так Страшно (Russia)
  • Хуго Уго - Тихо Молятся (Russia)
  • T-34 - Letnia Przygoda (Poland)
  • Lepsiruka Zdrana - Zrychlostni Pepicek (Poland)
  • Anarhia - Anarhia (Poland)
  • T-34 - Pierwsza Podroe (Poland)
  • T-34 - Czwowiek Z Zelaza (Poland)
  • T-34 - Dziadek Jozio (Poland)
  • T-34 - Czmarta Kontrola (Poland)
  • Izrael - Mania (Poland)
  • Jim Shepard - Drapez (Columbus)
  • Chrome - Pygmiez In Zee Park (San Fransisco)
  • Cabaret Voltaire - Kneel To The Boss (UK)
  • Crashblack Big Orange - Rain (Chicago)
  • Dobri Isak - Mi Placemo Iza Tamnih Naocara (Yugoslavia)
  • read more


              

    Mansfield performance audit released   

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    Source: Mansfield News Journal, July 12, 2011 COLUMBUS -- The Ohio Auditor's Office performance audit for the City of Mansfield, released today, makes recommendations that would save the city up to $3 million in recurring savings, according to a press...

    The post Mansfield performance audit released appeared first on AFSCME Privatization Update.


              

    Vegueta   

    Cache   

    Las Palmas de Gran Canaria

    Walk the limited, cobbled roads that were once gone to by Columbus, 500 years' again, in the old downtown area of Vegueta. Make a trip back in time to a world inhabited via seafarers and developers of grand basilicas in the old piece of the city, where the New World started - the majority of an unquestionable requirement.

    Vegueta virtual visit, Podcast from Las Palmas Official Tourism website


              

    A Review of the PWH Panel Discussion "Leading Through a Consolidating Industry" by Valeriya Stoyanova   

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    A review of the panel discussion from the June 13th Columbus, Ohio Networking Event.

    Panelists: Cathy Denning (Vizient), Sharyl Gardner (Midmark), Sean McNally (Cardinal Health), Randy Oostra (ProMedica).

    Key Topic: Changes in Healthcare

    The recent changes over the last few years in healthcare have caused quite the turmoil in the industry. Some of the most significant causes and effects are:

    • Value-base Purchasing
    • Mergers and Acquisitions
    • Culture change
    • MACRA
    • Reimbursement models, etc.

    Change is perceived either as a challenge and opportunity or as events causing fear and distress. There are two major questions that organizations face today: How can we manage change? How can we lead through change?

    Q&A:

    Part 1.

    Q: Which healthcare M&A has been surprising so far?

    A: (Sharyl Gardner): For Midmark Corp., the most surprising M&A has been the Hill-Rom-Welch Allyn acquisition, a direct competitor of Midmark. M&A’s challenge competitiveness and it’s all about “survival of the fittest.” M&A activity is also about reinvention and expanding one’s product/service offering (for example, Midmark’s acquisition of Versus Technology, Inc., the most-deployed real-time locating systems (RTLS) provider in healthcare. The acquisition of Versus allows Midmark to create a unique offering of clinical workflow solutions that encompass clinical workflow services, RTLS technology, medical equipment, diagnostic devices and design assistance, resulting in improved efficiency within health systems.    https://Model.blue/splash/Cjd6aMf7ebJ0EJdxR1Lq2lU2rXrd4uHEIKh65pNNBGGwfIwDCzGTkI4ATRt_PLUS_u9N2zRMBPfcl0tcngrgL2AuUw7_SLASH_bIWmyV5FNj92dWHBmAycazFiMmLsJKuaskKXfTvnVEDV_PLUS_82Y8zz_SLASH_y8dczzzstvnWrtxwiN6MMHf8edL1IyTSNSp_SLASH_UX6MNM3ue5H42f8yQRNOU_PLUS_UZTJUpeLBp6UZ_PLUS_dNsgYaLpcYRmF0GBjjN2uHmk_EQUALS).

    Q: How do companies in healthcare create value for their shareholders beyond product-buy?

    A: (Cathy Denning): For organizations that are “member-owned,” such as Vizient, the shareholders are easily identified: the members. The main focus must be on the member/customer. Cathy interprets “value beyond product” as providing the best quality for best price to its members, which translates into striving for better outcomes.  Value can be created through the introduction or expansion of data analytics for every service line offered.




    Q: How does the organizational structure change during a merger and what is the most effective way to manage it?

    A: (Cathy Denning): After a merger or acquisition, such as the joining of VHA, University HealthSystem Consortium and Novation forming Vizient, it is vital that leaders evaluate the quicks and characteristics of the overall culture of each legacy company. Vizient’s Chief People Officer is dedicated to evaluate, build and enhance a joint culture based on the various strengths, not necessarily eliminating and replacing existing culture altogether.  It is crucial that through any set of changes, that employee continue to be passionate about the customer and make the customer a priority.


    Q: What has been the impact of industry consolidation on innovation?

    A: (Randy Oostra): Where innovation is concerned, scale matters. The larger the organization, the more resources and strategic planning it can offer.

    For example, ProMedica has created an innovation committee, which along with other non-profit organizations, has raised significant capital ($15M-$20M) to support local start-up companies. ProMedica held its 4th Annual Innovations Summit in early June 2017, which aims to foster creativity within its own system, as well as the community. To further support its mission, the health system has partnered with The Toledo Museum of Art, and during its 4 years, over 120 patent applications have been submitted for approval.

    On both a corporate and individual level, we all need to commit to re-invent ourselves every day in thinking and doing.

    Mr. Oostra posed the questions: Do organizations have strategic planning sky days? What systems and processes do companies have to foster and develop creativity and new ideas? 

    It seems like this is a good time to reflect on these questions.  Perhaps, this is a good time to re-group, evaluate and outline a new path forward. 

    Stay tuned for Part II!



    By Valeriya Stoyanova, Supplier Relations, Administrative Assistant, Concordance Healthcare Solutions


              

    Part II - A Review of the PWH Panel Discussion "Leading Through a Consolidating Industry" by Valeriya Stoyanova   

    Cache   

    A review of the panel discussion from the June 13th Columbus, Ohio Networking Event.

    Panelists: Cathy Denning (Vizient), Sharyl Gardner (Midmark), Sean McNally (Cardinal Health), Randy Oostra (ProMedica).

     




    Part 2.

    Q: What do M&A’s create for members/customers?

    A: (Shawn McNally): Cardinal Health is a great example of a company whose growth is deeply dependent on M&A’s. Due to the constant evolution, such companies have the ability from a resource standpoint to offer cost solutions and innovative solutions through the utilization of new technology and processes.

    M&A’s create opportunities by growing the mindset of embracing change; create value for both customers and employees and offer opportunities for leadership development.




    Q: How would you determine the state of the healthcare industry?

    A: (Randy Oostra): “Healthcare today is a hot mess!”

    Over the last 20 years, the healthcare industry has been in a constant state of change in efforts to improve the model and cost trajectory.  Despite its vision, ACA was not able to accomplish that speeding up consolidations in every sector of healthcare.

    Medicare & Medicaid expenses have reached up to 20% of GDP in the last few years, compared to 5% of GDP 50 years ago. Increasing healthcare costs are the number one cause of debt among citizens filing bankruptcy.

    The rise of consumerism, most prominent in Millennials and their increasing buying behaviors is another powerful disruptor, causing the evolution of virtual and telemedicine.

    Q: What internal education and leadership programs do each of your organizations offer its employees?

    A: Sean McNally (Cardinal): Cardinal has designated a Talent Development Team. In the past, the company had sought talent primarily from technical universities. Recently, the executive leadership has stressed the importance of opening the doors to students and graduates of Liberal Arts universities as well. Cardinal works extensively with OSU and Vanderbilt University.

    The company encourages employees to be heavily involved in various projects within the company, as well as the community.

    Another initiative process that Cardinal has implemented is mandatory job rotations to promote cross-training and talent development.


    A: Sharyl Gardner (Midmark): Midmark has introduced multiple cross-functional teams to collaborate internally and externally. The company has also launched individual development plans for employees to nurture and develop their personal and professional talents.

     




    A: Cathy Denning (Vizient): Vizient has implemented a Succession Plan” for C-Level leaders whose goal is to  create a path for passing knowledge, planning and training the future successors as baby boomers exit the workforce.

     




    A: Randy Oostra (ProMedica): Individual Career Planning has been implemented by ProMedica to increase education among certain groups and prepare the next generation of leaders (“40 under 40” – 40 employees under 40 years of age; “The 9-box” grid is utilized for examining talent within the organization and making talent decisions).

     




    Personal Learnings & Takeaways:

    “Change is the only constant in life” – Heraclitus

    In the highly dynamic healthcare industry marked by the era of consolidation across every sector, Heraclitus’ quote cannot be truer as companies are scrambling to stay relevant by constantly reinventing culture and processes every day.

    During the panel discussion at the PWH Columbus Networking Event “Leading through a Consolidating Industry,” the message that echoed loud and clear was: Invest in your people. From stakeholders, such as customers to suppliers and partners, to employees and the communities we represent the mission to achieve success lies in investing in people and spreading knowledge. In order to thrive, organizations need to concentrate on delivering value to each of these groups while improving outcomes.

    Prosperous companies understand that the customer comes first because of the solutions our communities, industry partners and employees offer, while cohesively carrying out their corporate vision. Leaders understand that change starts from within the organization by the individuals who relentlessly ensure that the transition or challenge the company faces will have a successful outcome. Leading through change means creating a customer-centric culture and expanding creative and innovative thoughts and processes. Discovering and developing talent through internal education, leadership and career-planning programs is crucial to the vitality and sustainability of our industry.


    By Valeriya Stoyanova, Supplier Relations, Administrative Assistant, Concordance Healthcare Solutions


              

    The Return of White Flight   

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    America’s downtowns, particularly those of the major cities at the heart of large metro regions of over one million people, have seen significant residential development and population growth in the recent years. Downtown Chicago, for example, has nearly 100,000 more residents than it did in the 1980s. Visit almost any downtown and see many nearly identical apartment buildings sprouting.

    Many of these new residents are young, educated, and white, creating a narrative of a white return to the city. This return, often labeled gentrification, is frequently seen as a threat to lower income minorities in urban neighborhoods.

    But while downtown and near-downtown neighborhoods across America are in fact seeing population growth, much of it white, outside of this fairly contained zone, white (non-Hispanic) population trends in the broader central areas turned negative during the course of the 2010s, as the housing market recovered from the Great Recession and enabled renewed outmigration to the suburbs.

    This has been notable across Heartland urban regions. Recent Census ethnicity estimates at the county level reveal a significant shift from the earlier to the later part of the decade in most central counties.

    Demographics for selected metro areas in midwest U.S.

    The data values are total year over year white population change vs. the previous year. So the 2011 value is the total white population change between 7/1/2010 and 7/1/2011, and so on. The chart is sorted in decreasing order of total white percentage population change over the decade.

    If you look at Franklin County, OH (Columbus), St. Louis (an independent city) Jefferson County, KY (Louisville), Marion County, IN (Indianapolis), you can see that they were gaining white population early in the decade but shifting to losing it later in the decade. Some of these counties posted solid overall population growth, which masked this underlying trend.

    Among counties that grew white population throughout the decade, we also saw growth slowdowns in all of them. They were adding noticeably fewer white residents at the end of the decade than at the beginning. Jackson County, MO (Kansas City) is something of an exception.

    Similarly, some of those counties showing persistent white population decline saw an acceleration in that trend over the course of the decade. But that was not true for all of these. Cuyahoga County, OH (Cleveland) had the highest white population loss, for example, but was pretty steady over the course of the decade.

    People like William Frey of Brookings have been pointing out how urban population growth tailed off in the second half of the decade. This data suggests that a return of white flight may be a part of the reason why. Young, white, and educated people may be moving into downtowns, but the broader trend in white population in central county areas is turning negative.

    Aaron M. Renn is a contributing editor at City Journal, and an economic development columnist for Governing magazine. He focuses on ways to help America’s cities thrive in an ever more complex, competitive, globalized, and diverse twenty-first century. During Renn’s 15-year career in management and technology consulting, he was a partner at Accenture and held several technology strategy roles and directed multimillion-dollar global technology implementations.

    Photo credit: Eric Fischer via Flickr under CC 2.0 License


              

    Columbus Day   

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    Columbus Day commemorates Columbus' famed expedition across the Atlantic Ocean, in which he hoped to find a naval route to India. Instead, he found an entire continent that was mostly unknown to Europeans at the time. While other Europeans had sporadically visited the Americas earlier, and there are varied theories of even earlier contact by East Asians, Phoenicians, and others, Columbus' expedition triggered the great wave of European interest in the New World. Unlike the earlier visitors, Columbus aggressively popularized his discoveries and arranged for return voyages. Columbus day is celebrated in America on the second Monday in October.

              

    Columbus Day   

    Cache   

    Columbus Day commemorates Columbus' famed expedition across the Atlantic Ocean, in which he hoped to find a naval route to India. Instead, he found an entire continent that was mostly unknown to Europeans at the time. While other Europeans had sporadically visited the Americas earlier, and there are varied theories of even earlier contact by East Asians, Phoenicians, and others, Columbus' expedition triggered the great wave of European interest in the New World. Unlike the earlier visitors, Columbus aggressively popularized his discoveries and arranged for return voyages. Columbus day is celebrated in America on the second Monday in October.

              

    The fake cleanup of the IOR: no one touches the “dirty thirty”    

    Cache   

    The fake cleanup of the IOR: no one touches the “dirty thirty”



    By Andrew Parrish
    Pewsitter.com


    February 2nd, 2017

    (Serena Sartini / Infovaticana) ROME – The Institute for the Works of Religion (IOR): a name synonymous with intrigues, cardinals’ power games, and shady business deals. From the era of Cardinal Marcinkus, the “banker of God”, to this day, the so-called “Vatican Bank” has been awash in scandal, financial and otherwise. To name only a few: the collapse of the Banco Ambrosiano, the ongoing Italian investigation into Benedict-era senior officials and the sentencing of Monsignor Nunzio Scarano for money laundering. With Pope Francis, have things changed? Have the long-awaited cleanup operation and transparency arrived? The auditing of accounts? Has the alignment with international accounting standards been completed?

    The Errors of Francis

    With the election of Francis, many expected a revolution in Vatican finances to arrive at last. But the real turning point for the IOR came in the final years of Benedict XVI’s pontificate. Some say, rightly, that the resignation of the Pope Emeritus was decided in part because so many things, too many perhaps, were not so clear and clean within the Institute, despite his efforts. And the revolution of Bergoglio has, in its turn, not arrived.

    Things remained murky and turbulent, even after the new Pope transferred the Vatican finances dossier to the Australian Cardinal George Pell. This move would soon prove to be a misstep; Pell wanted to concentrate control of all Vatican finances in his own hands, supporting not only the so-called “Maltese lobby” but also the lobby of the Knights of Columbus, two powerful and wealthy financial entities.

    Another move considered a mistake by most observers was to appoint the lawyer Rene Brulhart to the presidency of the Financial Intelligence Authority (AIF), the Vatican’s corruption and laundering watchdog. The Swiss lawyer came to the position despite accusations of malfeasance by the Governing Council of the very organization he was nevertheless made president of. Replacing Brulhart as director was Tommaso Di Ruzza, son of the former governor of the Bank of Italy. Both were soon strongly criticized, with exorbitant salaries out of line with the austerity directives being promoted by Francis. Brulhart made 420,000 euro per year, and his subordinate Di Ruzza a figure around 240,000.

    Luxury and Child Abuse

    Within a year Bergoglio would reconsider his decision, and move to sharply scale back the power of Cardinal Pell. In July of 2016, he promulgated a Motu Proprio which closed the controversy over the management and administration of the Holy See’s property, establishing a clear separation of powers: the Secretary of Economy, and then Cd. Pell, would oversee but not directly manage the Vatican’s assets. There were many reasons for this halt to the original expansion of Cd. Pell’s powers: the child abuse charges which followed the Cardinal from Australia, though they have now been settled, cast a dim light on an organization desperately trying to shed scandal. More pertinently, muckraker Antonio Fittipaldi revealed dismaying details of Cardinal Pell’s financial habits in the “Avarice” volume of his “Vatileaks II” releases: abnormal business travel charges, 47,000 euro on furniture, 4,600 euro on a sink. These revelations were too much for Pope Francis.

    The (Gentle) Cleanup by Auditors

    One of the most critical details in the IOR cleanup project is the control of accounts. In the last five years, the Institute has closed 4,935 of them. At this time, there are still 14,801 accounts open. The policy sorting through these accounts was instituted by Benedict and continued by Francis: no anonymous accounts, no accounts made payable to fake names, no preferential treatment of the children and grandchildren of cardinals, strict records of transactions, strict procedures for suspicious transactions, and narrower provisions for the use of cash.

    “But,” as Vatican sources have revealed to InfoVaticana, “there are thirty accounts that really matter – and until they are touched, there is no cleanup.” The sources have also mentioned “black money”, tax havens, and accounts linked to American intelligence agencies. Obviously Francis is not able to rearrange a complicated dossier when the “cleaners” themselves are the beneficiaries of vague bookkeeping.

    The Real Turning Point Was Ratzinger

    Many attribute the beginning of the cleanliness and transparency operation in the IOR to Francis. However, the real turning point was Joseph Ratzinger, thanks to the Dec. 30th, 2010 Motu Proprio which established the AIF and instituted the registration of suspicious transactions and customers in the IOR. This work is begun in April of 2011, but for the Secretary of State, headed by Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, it went too fast: they risked losing control of the situation. The sacred rooms trembled, Bertone hit the brakes, the AIF did not work in the way he wanted. The clash between IOR leaders and Cd. Bertone culminated in May 2012 with the expulsion of the IOR’s president, Ettore Gotti Tedeschi. Afterwards, the AIF lost its independence, and was taken under the supervision of the State Secretariat, losing the autonomy which was the sole purpose of its creation. Benedict XVI announced his resignation on the 11th of February, 2013; four days later, the Commission of Cardinals of the IOR appointed the German banker Ernst von Freyburg (Ed. note – member of the Order of Malta’s German wing) as IOR president. A few months after taking office, the new pope entrusts the management of finances to Cardinal Pell. Before the natural expiration of his term, von Freyburg is shown the door, and replaced with Jean-Baptiste de Franssu. This was the first victory of the Australian cardinal; soon after, however, his descent begins.

    There are so many questions that are still unanswered about this period. Why was Gotti Tedeschi driven out by Bertone? Was it perhaps because he had repeatedly stopped the Cardinal from investing in the San Raffaele hospital project (Ed. note - tied to Qatar, a major terrorist financier), or because Bertone wanted the OK of the IOR for other strange banking? Why was von Freyburg shown the door before the end of his term? But above all, why was the AIF – created to oversee the operations of the IOR and to clean up its accounts – put under the umbra of the Vatican Secretary of State?

    Dark Spots

    The Moneyval inspectors arrived for the first time in the Vatican in 2011, and underlined the “important steps achieved in a short time” by the hard work of the AIF. With regards to Bertone’s foot on the brake, the experts from the Council of Europe speak of “backtracking” – but say it very diplomatically, trying to keep open the collaboration with Vatican bank officials. The first official act of Moneyval is the July 4th, 2012 Assessment Report, consisting of forty recommendations on money laundering and nine on anti-terrorism made by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF). Of the sixteen key recommendations, nine were positive and seven negative. Among the critical points were those related to international cooperation and an inadequate communications system; one point on the identification of customers, and the lack of procedures for reporting suspicious transactions; a note on the lack of adequate rules for the seizure of suspect goods and for cross-border transfers. These are important areas in the fight against money laundering and financial support of terrorism, still unexplored and unreformed.

    This is still, therefore, the path that the Vatican Bank must take to align with international standards. It remains to be seen in 2018, when the Moneyval inspectors will be called upon to evaluate the concrete facts of the Vatican legal system’s efficiency, whether they will settle for the pure window dressing currently implemented by AIF president Brulhart and IOR president De Franssu.

    A rough translation from the original Italian with the aid of Google Translate.

    ...

              

    Comment on EMBORICUATE HAS A HISTORY by amnjr   

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    “Puerto Ricans get no respect.” To wit: “Coors Light is sponsoring Parade ads that show large bottles of beer with the “Emboricuate” which means “become Puerto Rican”…these ads suggest…that drinking beer is an central part of our culture.” Well here in Hartford, we apparently have no self-respect! The parade organizers year after year sanction the participation in the parade route of bail bondsmen. Not for having sponsored some school, club, church, performers etc. All they bring to the party is a vehicle bearing its name, and some folks waving Puerto Rican flags. I live on main street, and every parade of every kind passes beneath my view. The UCONN basketball NCAA victory parades, St. Patrick’s, Columbus, Peruvian Independence Day; Ukrainian commemoration of the Stalin-created famine; Veteran’s Day. The only parade that includes bail bondsmen in the procession is the Puerto Rican Day Parade. What a disgrace!

              

    Bankruptcy Attorneys Columbus   

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    Bankruptcy attorney in Columbus, Ohio that specializes in Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Scott Rice is located in Central Ohio to help people with their debt problems. Call for your free consultation.

              

    Sutton & Associates Home   

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    Sutton & Associates has an outstanding reputation for complete customer service and project execution. Our attention to the customer's needs and requests has been rewarded with a customer base founded on repeat business.

    Sutton & Associates has been serving the industrial refrigeration industry in Ohio since 1982. As a design build contractor we are ready to recommend the project solution that’s right for you through innovative engineering with a long-term operating costs and energy savings in mind.

    Based in Columbus, Ohio we have 25 years in the business. We are interested to learn more about your refrigeration needs; let us know how we can help.

     

    Ask about how Sutton & Associates can make your project Turnkey.

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